Festo HQ, the engineering team that brought us Aqua Penguins, Aqua Jellyfishdragonfly-inspired BionicOpters, and a robot that flies like a bird can now add Bionic Kangaroo to their list of animal-inspired achievements in technology. From spectrum.ieee.org

BionicKangaroo is able to realistically emulate the jumping behavior of real kangaroos, which means that it can efficiently recover energy from one jump to help it make another jump. Without this capability, kangaroos (real ones) would get very very tired very very quickly, but by using their tendons like elastic springs, the animals can bound at high speeds efficiently for substantial periods of time.

BionicKangaroo emulates this with an actual elastic spring, which partially “charges” the legs on landing.

Bonus fun: wear the corresponding armband and you can control the kangaroo using gestures. Mmmmmmm, biomechanics.

via Gizmodo.

That moment that ketchup transitions from a solid, high up in the ketchup bottle, to a liquid that squirts all over your fries – that moment is a big physics moment. Why? Ketchup is a non-Newtonian fluid (like oobleck, peanut butter, custard, toothpaste, paint, blood, or quicksand) that can switch between a solid and liquid state, and ketchup is non-Newtonian in two different ways…

In that transition moment, ketchup may be responding to a strong, quick force, suddenly making it thinner, or if you’re patient and apply just a wee bit of force, it may start flowing given some time and gravity. Grab a ketchup bottle and get the details in this TED Ed lesson by George Zaidan, with animation by TOGETHER.

Related watching: oobleck, TED Ed, the incredible physics of ants, and more about that sugar in your ketchup.

What does it look like when a car splashes a huge wave of water out of a puddle in slow motion? We’re about to find out: Slow Mo Guys Gav and Dan got together with race car driver Ken Gushi, a car, and a massive puddle of water to film a Huge Puddle Splash at 2500fps. And no, they didn’t wait for a warm day to do it.

In the archives, more car videos, more slow motion, and more Slow Mo Guys: How a Slinky falls.

This street vendor makes popcorn with an explosive, pressure-cooking, popcorn cannon contraption, a centuries-old method. The video was filmed in Zhengzhou, China, but we’ve watched videos of this in South Korea, too. And of course, Mythbusters has looked into it, video below. Boom!

Related watching: Click to Enlarge: Popcorn, more explosions, and more videos of street vendors, including how this intricately-drawn melted caramel/sugar dragon is made.

via Boing Boing.

We know that sugar is a big part of candy, ice cream, and sweet drinks, but did you know that added sugars are included in 3/4 of the 600,000+ products found in the average grocery store? And that it can go by 56 different names? 

Watch this super useful TED Ed by Robert Lustig, with animation by The Tremendousness Collective, to learn more about the different kinds of sugar inside the foods that we eat, and how it interacts with our bodies: Sugar: Hiding in plain sight.

Related watching: The Cook’s Atelier, China’s farm to table movementHow Gardening Enables Interdisciplinary Learning, and more TED Ed videos.