Neil Armstrong stepped onto the moon’s surface at 10:56pm EDT, July 20, 1969. Buzz Aldrin followed him 20 minutes after.

This was the CBS Television coverage, anchored by legendary newscaster Walter Cronkite. Live broadcast from the surface of the moon connects around 20m30s, but the simulations before that are a sort of sci-fi 60s treat.

From Wikipedia:

Armstrong said that moving in the lunar gravity, one-sixth of Earth’s, was “even perhaps easier than the simulations … It’s absolutely no trouble to walk around.” Aldrin joined him on the surface and tested methods for moving around, including two-footed kangaroo hops. The PLSS backpack created a tendency to tip backwards, but neither astronaut had serious problems maintaining balance. Loping became the preferred method of movement. The astronauts reported that they needed to plan their movements six or seven steps ahead. The fine soil was quite slippery. Aldrin remarked that moving from sunlight into Eagle’s shadow produced no temperature change inside the suit, though the helmet was warmer in sunlight, so he felt cooler in shadow.

And here’s a photo that Armstrong took of Aldrin (and of Armstrong in the visor’s reflection) on the moon’s “very fine-grained” powder-like surface:

596px-Aldrin_Apollo_11_original

“That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Updated with NASA video.