Along the foggy coasts of Peru, where millions of people don’t have access to clean water, Abel Cruz Gutiérrez helps catch 200 to 350 liters (around 50 to 100 gallons) of water per day with each ‘fog catcher’ he sets up. Gutiérrez leads El Movimiento Peruanos Sin Agua (Peruvians Without Water), an association of entrepreneurs that’s combating Peru’s water shortage by harvesting water from the air.

The Great Big Story video above shares how it works: Microdroplets of water collect in nylon nets, drip into connected pipes, and are stored in larger tanks for use by residents in Lima’s low-income neighborhoods. Though the water isn’t drinkable, a challenge that Gutiérrez is trying to solve, it’s perfect for farming, raising animals, washing clothes, bathing, and more.

Related reading: Peru’s fog catchers net water supplies and ‘Cloud fishing’ reels in precious water for villagers in rural Morocco.

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