1960s

Showing 18 posts tagged 1960s

In 1961, an interactive exhibition called Mathematica: A World of Numbers… and Beyond inaugurated the new science wing at Los Angeles’ California Museum of Science and Industry. Sponsored by IBM, it was an innovative exhibit designed by husband and wife team Charles and Ray Eames, and lucky for us, it included five short animations that explored a handful of math concepts. Watch three of our favorites:

Above, 2ⁿ – “a story about the exponential growth of numbers raised to powers.” Below, Symmetry and testing for degrees of it:

Also, Topology – how a closed curve dissects a plane into inside and outside sections:

And in the archives, don’t miss this iconic Eames film: Powers of Ten.

via Tinybop.

From the National Film Board of Canada, this is Quebec director Gilles Carle’s The Rink. Details we noticed on this idyllic Sunday in 1962: everyone’s warm breath in the cold air, there are no helmets on the hockey players, there are no visible logos or designs on the clothes like there are today, that ladder obstacle course looks fun, and bright red coats look absolutely amazing against the white snow and ice.

Watch more winter videos, including this 2012 ice skating on the Amsterdam canals vid.

Julie Andrews and Gene Kelly play The Tapping Game… and they sing and dance, because when you have Julie Andrews and Gene Kelly on stage together, that’s what happens. This clip is from a 1965 Thanksgiving weekend variety special called The Julie Andrews Show.

The Tapping Game has proven useful for waiting rooms, grocery store lines, rainy days, and the like. Related watching: pen drumming, playing the river like a drum, and objects falling to make rhythm.

Bonus: Fred Astaire dances with drums and Gene Kelly sings and dances in the rain.

Comparing different versions of familiar stories can be a great example of how many ways there are to see the world. The video above is a fascinating example: Winnie-the-Pooh (Винни-Пух, 1969) by Russian animator Fyodor Khitruk. From Open Culture

Created between 1969 and 1972, Khitruk’s three films star a bear named “Vinni-Pukh” who looks nothing like the Winnie the Pooh that Westerners grew up with. (You can see the original illustrations of Pooh by E.H. Shepard here.) But viewers will certainly recognize the storyline and spirit of the original Pooh in the Soviet adaptations. For decades, these films have enchanted East European viewers, both young and old. And they still occasionally appear on Russian TV.

It’s also fun to watch videos in another language. How much is communicated via context, patterns, intonations, and gestures? (You can also click the CC button at the bottom of the video for English subtitles.)

Watch Khitruk’s two other animations: Winnie-the-Pooh Goes on a Visit (Винни-Пух идет в гости, 1971) and Winnie-the-Pooh and the Day of Concern (Винни-Пух и день забот, 1972).

via Open Culture.