1980s

Showing 11 posts tagged 1980s

This project, 40 Years of Cellphone by Amrit Pal Singh, gives a brief tech history lesson for anyone who can’t remember what phones were like before smartphones, starting with the DynaTAC in 1974 and featuring just a few of the more popular models through the years. From Singh:

If you recognize the voice in the script, you’ll know it’s from an old advertisement from 1980s for DynaTAC. At the time, no one knew how big mobile would become…

Related watching — Museum of Obsolete Objects: The Quill.

via Devour.

Above, watch molten gold transform into gold leaf as it is beaten into thinner and thinner pieces while cold. This clip is from PBS’ six-part miniseries The Ring of Truth: An Inquiry Into How We Know What We Know - Atoms (1987). 

"It was the craftsmen who mastered the remarkable properties that go with specific materials. They were the first to journey towards the atom. The goldsmiths slowly refined their craft to take advantage of what gold alone could do…”

MIT astrophysicist and Institute Professor Philip Morrison narrated the series, which he co-wrote with his wife, noted art and science educator Phylis Morrison. Philip Morrison also narrated and wrote the script for Charles and Ray Eames’ Powers of Ten, a must-watch video for all ages.

via Emily Lakdawalla.

When you’re looking to buy an instrument, you should really test it out to make sure it’s still in good condition. In this scene from the Blues Brothers (1980), Elwood and Jake get some help from music store owner Ray Charles to find out if an electric keyboard has any action left in it.

While the movie was written for mature audiences, this scene is a classic that has the kids up and dancing every time we watch it: Blues Brothers & Ray Charles - Shake a Tail Feather.

There are more movie clips in the archives.

Imagine that the age of the universe, 13.82 billion years, is compressed into only one year. Carl Sagan explains this idea (using 15 billion years as his example) in a clip from his 1980 television series, Cosmos: A Personal Journey.

On this Cosmic Calendar, the Big Bang happens on January 1st at midnight, and we are at the end of the year, midnight on December 31st. Now look backwards: 

Down here, the first humans made their debut around 10:30 p.m. on December 31st. And with the passing of every cosmic minute — each minute 30,000 years long — we began the arduous journey towards understanding where we live and who we are.

11:46 - only 14 minutes ago, humans have tamed fire.

11:59:20 - the evening of the last day of the cosmic year — the 11th hour, the 59th minute, the 20th second — the domestication of plants and animals began, an application of the human talent for making tools.

11:59:35 - settled agricultural communities evolved into the first cities.

We humans appear on the cosmic calendar so recently that our recorded history occupies only the last few seconds of the last minute of December 31st. In the vast ocean of time which this calendar represents, all our memories are confined to this small square.

Every person we’ve ever heard of lived somewhere in there. All those kings and battles, migrations and inventions, wars and loves. Everything in the history books happens here, in the last 10 seconds of the cosmic calendar.

More Carl Sagan in the archives, along with The Big Bang and, looking forward, Al Jarnow’s Cosmic Clock.

via @alexanderchen.