ISS

Showing 7 posts tagged ISS

This Feb 2013 promo video for the Kibo Robot Project really builds the excitement for having a 13.4 inch tall robot astronaut in space… just in case that didn’t already sound exciting. (Turn on the translated captions!)

On August 9, 2013, an Astro Boy-inspired, talking robot named Kiroboa mix of Kibo, "hope" in Japanese, and robot — will arrive at the International Space Station on a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) supply ship.

Kirobo will work directly with JAXA engineer, astronaut, and human Koichi Wakata, who will take command of the ISS in November. The robot’s presence will also explore “how machines can lend emotional support to people isolated over long periods.” Among other functions, it is built with voice-, face-, and emotion- recognition technologies.

From PC Mag:

Of course, it’s not as easy as it sounds for a robot to become an astronaut. Researchers had to subject Kirobo to a number of different tests to determine whether the robot would be suitable for its weightless mission, including thermal analysis testing, electromagnetic compatibility testing, and a test to determine whether the general background noise on board the Internal Space Station might otherwise interfere with the robot’s voice-recognition capabilities.

Tested and approved, Kirobo left Earth on a rocket that took off from Tanegashima Space Center on August 3rd.

There are more robot videos and astronaut videos in the archives.

Canadian astronaut Commander Chris Hadfield has made it a part of his five month mission to educate about space, science and the International Space Station through a series of videos about daily life in space. In this one, he shows us how astronauts sleep on the ISS.

In case you’ve missed any of his fascinating reports, he’s also shown us how to wash our hands, brush our teeth, how we use math in space, how microgravity effects the body — how eyesight is affected and how food tastes — as well as what it’s like to cry in space

Be sure to watch all of Commander Hadfield’s Expedition 34/35 videos.

From PBS’ Digital Studios, It’s Okay to Be Smart's The Auroras, Earth’s Art Show! Learn More about the invisible forcefield — a magnetic field — that protects all life on Earth from space radiation, primarily Sun’s solar winds that bombard our atmosphere constantly. 

jtotheizzoe:

All that science has a beautiful side effect: It makes the auroras! The Northern and Southern lights are the result of the solar wind and its dance with Earth’s magnetic field and polar atmosphere. It’s like our own cosmic light show!

Watch more about space weather and magnetic fields, plus dont’ miss this fabulous-looking vid about how the aurora borealis is created in our archives.

We’ve seen this experiment a few times before, but never with Hello Kitty “catonaut” in a Japanese rocket made by a 12-year-old. And perhaps not with such a glorious pop:

NASA doesn’t have a lock on space exploration anymore. Just ask Lauren Rojas, a seventh grader in Antioch, Calif., who recently launched a balloon to 93,625 feet using a do-it-yourself balloon kit from High Altitude Science

The project is a terrific illustration of just how accessible the near-space environment has become. High Altitude Science was founded two years ago by Joseph Maydell, a flight controller for the International Space Station at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, who wanted everyone to experience the beautiful views of the planet that he got to see in the course of his work.

Not only does Maydell sell a kit and a flight computer on his site, but he also includes tutorials to get started with.

From the archives, more views of Earth’s curvature

via Scientific American.

Life’s daily little details get interesting when you live in microgravity. For example, how do astronauts wash their hands in spaceISS Commander and Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield demonstrates how. Hint: It involves grabbing a floating ball of liquid!

If you liked this, you’ll definitely want to go on a tour of the international space station with Commander Sunita Williams! Commander Hadfield has also demonstrated how astronauts clip their nails in space and what mixed nuts look like in space. Follow @Cmdr_Hadfield on Twitter.