Indonesia

Showing 12 posts tagged Indonesia

In this clip from PBS’ The Funkiest Monkeys, we travel into an Indonesian island rainforest to learn about the complex relationships of the extremely intelligent and social crested black macaques

There is an unusual looking monkey called the crested black macaque that is endemic to rainforests in Indonesia, which includes the island of Sulawesi. These striking black primates, sporting punk hairstyles and copper-colored eyes, first caught the attention and won the heart of wildlife cameraman and biologist Colin Stafford-Johnson 25 years ago. But since then, their numbers have dropped by almost 90 percent, so the filmmaker returns to the island to discover why and how he could help.

Upon his arrival, Stafford-Johnson finds a very different looking Sulawesi. An island once entirely covered in forest, is now undertaken with new roads, people and buildings. He meets up with the leader of a team of local biologists — Giyarto, or Ugi for short — who has been studying the macaques for seven years. Together they will make a film to show how special these monkeys are, hoping to involve the local community in protecting them before they disappear forever.

You can check out The Funkiest Monkeys trailer here. Related watching in the archives: Japanese macaques cuddle in hot springs, and more endangered creatures.

Despite what it looks like, this is not a short clip from a Hayao Miyazaki film. These are banggai cardinalfish eggs with still-forming fish inside. Their eyes are quite clear. Can you see their heartbeats?

These three small creatures were filmed pre-hatched by Richard Ross, CalAcademy’s Senior Biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium. Normally, male banggai cardinafish, Pterapogon kauderni, keep around 90 fertilized eggs in their mouths for 30 days while the eggs mature — they don’t eat at all during that month — but on occasion, some eggs are spit out early. Here’s another video that shows larger babies in a male’s mouth:

The caption by mikew9788: “They are so big now you can see that they have the same coloration as the adults. I expect the male to spit the babies out any day now.” 

While they are bred successfully in captivity, Banggai are endangered in the wilds of the Banggai Islands in Sulawesi, Indonesia. You can learn more at Banggai-Rescue.com.  

Watch more fish and more babies.

via Earth Touch.

What does it take to make a t-shirt? We’ve watched a video about this subject before, but NPR’s Planet Money answered this question in the most amazing way: they traveled across the globe to document the people and processes of this task firsthand. The stories are in five chapters. Above, Chapter 1: Cotton, and below, Chapter 2: Machines

A note for younger viewers: In Chapter 3: People, which features the story of Jasmine Akhter, a garment worker in Bangladesh, there are graphic scenes of the Rana Plaza factory building collapse from 3m10s to 3m52s.

You can watch the entire piece on their information-filled site: Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt.

In the archives: more videos about money and clothing.

via @faketv.

Little Rickina is a baby orangutan that was rescued from a suspected poacher, and is now being cared for at the Ketapang Orangutan Rescue Center, operated by International Animal Rescue. As a critically endangered orphan, she’s had a very difficult life, but this video shares a bit about the safe community that she’s now adjusting to. For more information, visit RedApes.org.

There are more babies and a family of orangutans in the archives. 

via ViralViralVideos.

Zookeeper Joy introduces the Houston Zoo's babirusa, a name that means “pig-deer” in Malay.

Indonesian island natives, babirusas are legendary for their unique tusks, and are thought to be pig relatives, but could be more closely related to hippos or peccaries. With fewer than 4000 left in the wild, babirusas are documented as vulnerable or endangered by the IUCN. Regarding their personalities, Tetrapod Zoology reports

Paul Irven (1996) wrote that captive babirusas are ‘sensitive and responsive … with an endearing character’. They are also said to exhibit excitement and enthusiasm on greeting familiar people, engaging in tail wagging, head shaking and jumping and running about.

Watch as 10-year-old Jambi enjoys a mud bath:

There are more zoo videos in the archives.