Japanese

Showing 12 posts tagged Japanese

Which tire will roll down the ski jump fastest and jump the farthest? A Formula One tire? An enormous bulldozer tire? The smallest tire? This clip from Japanese television has made the rounds in years past, but the video source disappeared. We watched it again when it reappeared on Metafilter. Gotta love the lab coats, white gloves, and the surprising last jump.

So which of these six tires would you guess makes the biggest jump? And why?

In the archives, more physics of falling and jumping: domino chain reaction, 2,000 ping pong balls and 30 teachers in zero-g, a cat landing on its feet, and the jumping sand flea robot.

We love Rube Goldberg machines, and have posted about these short films from Japan’s NHK educational TV show, Pitagora Suitchi (PythagoraSwitch) before, so it’s no surprise that this 20 minute video collection of their Pitagora devices had the kids completely thrilled and mesmerized. The kinetic chain reactions were designed by a team from Keio University’s Masahiko Sato Laboratory. Watch them online while you can!

Related great fun: Joseph Herscher’s The Page Turner.

Thanks, @990000.

This Feb 2013 promo video for the Kibo Robot Project really builds the excitement for having a 13.4 inch tall robot astronaut in space… just in case that didn’t already sound exciting. (Turn on the translated captions!)

On August 9, 2013, an Astro Boy-inspired, talking robot named Kiroboa mix of Kibo, "hope" in Japanese, and robot — will arrive at the International Space Station on a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) supply ship.

Kirobo will work directly with JAXA engineer, astronaut, and human Koichi Wakata, who will take command of the ISS in November. The robot’s presence will also explore “how machines can lend emotional support to people isolated over long periods.” Among other functions, it is built with voice-, face-, and emotion- recognition technologies.

From PC Mag:

Of course, it’s not as easy as it sounds for a robot to become an astronaut. Researchers had to subject Kirobo to a number of different tests to determine whether the robot would be suitable for its weightless mission, including thermal analysis testing, electromagnetic compatibility testing, and a test to determine whether the general background noise on board the Internal Space Station might otherwise interfere with the robot’s voice-recognition capabilities.

Tested and approved, Kirobo left Earth on a rocket that took off from Tanegashima Space Center on August 3rd.

There are more robot videos and astronaut videos in the archives.

We love artist Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests, and as it turns out, so does Mythbuster Adam Savage. Watch Adam describe and build a Japanese-made Strandbeest Model Kit. These advanced building kits can be found on Amazon, Ebay, and MakerShed.

(Psst… you can also find one of the Strandbeest kit’s instructions pdf’d here in English.) 

From the New Yorker, watch a video of Theo Jansen’s Strandbeests here.

via Jamie & Adam’s Tested.