NPR

Showing 12 posts tagged NPR

What Does Sound Look Like? NPR’s SkunkBear shows us the differences in fluid densities — in the form of compression waves in a gas, the air that surrounds us — thanks to the light passing through those fluids. Schlieren flow visualization and a high speed video camera make it possible. 

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound. 

More seriously amazing physics videos the archives: underwater bubble rings, a fluidized bed of sand, and huge wingtip vortices.

What does it take to make a t-shirt? We’ve watched a video about this subject before, but NPR’s Planet Money answered this question in the most amazing way: they traveled across the globe to document the people and processes of this task firsthand. The stories are in five chapters. Above, Chapter 1: Cotton, and below, Chapter 2: Machines

A note for younger viewers: In Chapter 3: People, which features the story of Jasmine Akhter, a garment worker in Bangladesh, there are graphic scenes of the Rana Plaza factory building collapse from 3m10s to 3m52s.

You can watch the entire piece on their information-filled site: Planet Money Makes a T-Shirt.

In the archives: more videos about money and clothing.

via @faketv.

Here’s a fascinating science experiment that we’ll be trying this weekend: 

Put a blindfold on someone, take them to a park or a beach or a meadow and ask them to walk for as long as they can in a straight line. Then watch what happens.

Why Can’t We Walk Straight? from Robert Krulwich and the team at NPR in 2010.

More mysteries of the brain lurk in the archives.

via insteadofwatchingtv.