Topic: national geographic

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Bigger Than T. Rex: Spinosaurus

The water-loving Spinosaurus had a spiny "sail" on its back, and a crocodile-like head, neck and tail, but was much larger than the Tyrannosaurus Rex. At 50 feet long, it's the largest carnivore to walk (and swim) the...

The Portuguese Man-of-War Up Close

This incredible video, and the corresponding photos featured at National Geographic, are by retired combat photographer Aaron Ansarov, who photographs the Portuguese man-of-war (and releases them unharmed) when they w...

How to Create Your Own Monarch Butterfly Rest Stop

Creating your own Monarch Butterfly rest stop -- a common milkweed and nectar plant-filled garden that is free of pesticides and herbicides -- can help make a huge impact on the rapid decline of Monarch butterfly popu...

How Do You Dismantle a Dino? (Very Carefully)

We've learned a lot about dinosaur anatomy since displays of their bones were set up at The National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., "anywhere from the early 1900s through 1940s, 50s, and 60s." As a par...

Photographer Swims With Huge Goliath Groupers

"They remind me of my family, like my Uncle Johnny from New Jersey," explains photographer David Doubilet of Florida's massive goliath groupers. From National Geographic: They gather on shipwrecks and reefs to eat ...

The largest school of rays ever caught on film

Tens of thousands of mobula rays come together off the coast of Baja California in a brilliant display of their massive numbers underwater. Then watch them breach for reasons unknown. The leaps out of the water are sp...

Urban Gardeners Grow Crops in Spare Spaces

Urban garden designer Meredith Sheperd describes how growing fresh fruit and vegetables can be a successful part of city life, despite limited space and resources. From National Geographic, explore a variety of Washin...

A Deer Migration You Have to See to Believe

Traverse three highways, multiple water crossings, sand dunes, and over 100 fences in A Deer Migration You Have to See to Believe. This National Geographic video by Joe Riis shares the incredible yearly journey of mul...

A cliff wall full of dinosaur footprints in Spain

There’s a cliff wall full of 70 million year old dinosaur footprints in Spain’s Pyrenees mountains, just a 1.5 hour drive north from Barcelona. In this episode of Jurassic CSI, Walk...

Ancient Ancestors Come to Life at the Smithsonian

"The human story is really nothing short of the story of a little corner of the universe becoming aware of itself." From National Geographic, paleo-artist John Gurche creates realistic huma...

Onward: Searching for Life in Iceland’s Frigid Fissures

In Onward: Searching for Life in Iceland’s Frigid Fissures, National Geographic grantee and biology researcher Jónína Ólafsdóttir goes diving in search of tiny arthropods in the underwater volcanic fissures of ...

Polar Bears Eat Goose Eggs

Polar Bears Eat Goose Eggs in the Arctic’s summer months, but now scientists are studying how melting sea ice might affect the bears’ eating habits in the years to come. Will more eggs be on their menu? U...

The tiny glass frog of Costa Rica

The size of a human fingernail, this tiny glass frog in Costa Rica is a wonder to watch. In this clip from the Discovery Channel’s Speed of Life, you can see the glass frog’s rice g...

A Baby Sperm Whale Swims on Its Own

A huge baby Sperm Whale swimming alone in sunlit waters while its mother dives deep into the dark ocean for food. However, the baby isn’t as alone as it seems; he can hear his mother’s familiar sonar clic...

Sumo Wrestling

To be the winner of a sumo bout, you have forced your opponent to either step out of the ring or touch the ground with some part of their body that is not the bottom of their feet. From Nation...

Nat Geo Wild: The Pangolin

We had never heard of a pangolin until we watched A quick search turned up this fascinating video by NatGeo Wild, which shows how this prehistoric-looking mammal walks on its hind legs, showing off its kera...

Shelter in 24hrs: Emergency Concrete-laced Canvas Tent

From National Geographic’s I Didn’t Know That, this flexible, concrete-laced canvas can be put up by two people and ready to use as shelter within 24 hours. It’s essentiall...

The Impact of One Cotton T-Shirt

In collaboration with the World Wildlife Fund, National Geographic just released a video explaining the impact of a cotton t-shirt: how much water it takes to make just one, how much energy it takes to grow, manufactu...

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