Topic: national geographic

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The ‘Bear Bathtub’ in Yellowstone National Park

There's a swimmin' hole in the wilds of Yellowstone National Park where the bears like to bathe. It's affectionately (and accurately) nicknamed the Bear Bathtub, and thanks to camera trap technology, we get to see how...

Saving the Andean Bear, South America’s only bear species

In the diverse mountain habitats of the Andes Mountains, the Andean bear, also known as the spectacled bear because of the mask-like fur around its eyes, is the focus of multiple conservation efforts. Local government...

40,000 years of London history created with papercraft

Peel back the pavement of a grand old city like London and you can find just about anything, from a first-century Roman fresco to a pair of medieval ice skates—even an elephant’s tooth. As one of Europe’s oldest capit...

Drifting With the Ice: Life on an Arctic Expedition

For five months in 2015, a team of researchers drifted with polar ice, their ship tethered to an ice floe as they collected data to help them better understand how the loss of sea ice will affect the planet. The air a...

Climate Change 101 with Bill Nye + solutions great and small

What is climate change, what causes it, and how do we mitigate its effects? Bill Nye summarizes Climate Change 101 in concert with National Geographic's Climate Change issue and COP21, the December 2015 Paris Climate ...

Paleoartist John Gurche reconstructs the face of Homo naledi

Paleoartist John Gurche is known for his award-winning reconstructions of our ancient human ancestors. His process of mixing forensic accuracy with emotional realism has been featured in documentaries by National Geog...

Deep in the caves with Homo Naledi & the Rising Star Expedition

More than 1,500 individual bones and teeth of at least 15 skeletons of Homo naledi were excavated by an all-woman "underground astronaut" team during the 2013/14 Rising Star Expedition. Homo naledi is a new species in...

The Corpse Flower: Behind the Stink of the Titan Arum

Corpse Flowers (Amorphophallus titanum), including Berkeley's Trudy the Titain Arum and The Denver Botanic Garden's Stinky DBG (live video feed), have made news in 2015. The massive plants can bloom every 2-3 years, o...

Chameleons are Amazing – National Geographic

We've enjoyed quite a few chameleon videos, but this National Geographic video is not only full of fascinating information, it's visually stunning. From how they shoot their tongues like arrows to catch bugs, to how t...

The Amazing Art of Bread Baking in Tajikistan

From National Geographic, this is how traditional, homemade Tajik non is baked in a tanur oven in Kumsangir, Tajikistan. Round and flat, it's a huge part of meals in Tajikistan, where many areas are non-arable, and "w...

Flying a drone over Sudan’s 3,000 year old Nubian Pyramids

Present-day Sudan has more pyramids than Egypt does, smaller structures known as Nubian pyramids that were built by the rulers of the ancient Kushite kingdoms. The first site of these royal tombs was in El-Kurru in no...

The first 21 days of a bee’s life, a time lapse in 64 seconds

Honey bees are such an integral part of our ecosystem -- they pollenate 1/3 of our food crops -- yet we don't understand all that we should about their life cycle, or what has been threatening them in the last few yea...

Emperor Penguins Speed Launch Out of the Water

We've seen a video of penguins rocketing out of the water as if powered by jets, but we've never seen it happen from underwater... until now. In this National Geographic clip, photographer Paul Nicklen captures how th...

Slime Cannon Attack – How Velvet Worm slime jets work

Giant velvet worms (Peripatus solorzanoi) are unusual creatures for many reasons -- including the fact that they are "not worms, not insects, millipedes, centipedes, or slugs" -- but their super-sliming glands, rapidl...

Bigger Than T. Rex: Spinosaurus

The water-loving Spinosaurus had a spiny "sail" on its back, and a crocodile-like head, neck and tail, but was much larger than the Tyrannosaurus Rex. At 50 feet long, it's the largest carnivore to walk (and swim) the...

The Portuguese Man-of-War Up Close

This incredible video, and the corresponding photos featured at National Geographic, are by retired combat photographer Aaron Ansarov, who photographs the Portuguese man-of-war (and releases them unharmed) when they w...

How to Create Your Own Monarch Butterfly Rest Stop

Creating your own Monarch Butterfly rest stop -- a common milkweed and nectar plant-filled garden that is free of pesticides and herbicides -- can help make a huge impact on the rapid decline of Monarch butterfly popu...

How Do You Dismantle a Dino? (Very Carefully)

We've learned a lot about dinosaur anatomy since displays of their bones were set up at The National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., "anywhere from the early 1900s through 1940s, 50s, and 60s." As a par...

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