PBS

Showing 32 posts tagged PBS

Sesame Street's Telly teams up with 5facts' Annie Colbert and Matt Silverman to explore sand, chalk, strawberries, velcro, and lint up close: 5 Hidden Worlds Revealed Under a “MEGA” MICROSCOPE, microscope, microscope…

For more science, tech, engineering, and math with Sesame Street, check out SesameStreet.org/STEM, and in the archives: Annie, Matt, and Grover do science.

The question “Who was the first human?” was a very popular one in our house just last year, but the evolution videos we had in the archives – even the awesome Five Fingers of Evolution TED Ed video – didn’t answer it directly enough for my kids. This visual-filled video timeline from Joe Hanson of It’s Okay to Be Smart does: There was no first human.

You can never pinpoint the exact moment that a species came to be, because it never did. Just like how you used to be a baby and now you’re older, but there was no single day when you went to bed young and woke up old…

There was no first human. It sounds like a paradox, it sounds like it breaks the whole theory of evolution, but it’s really a key to truly understanding how evolution works. 

Also, your grandparents (a hundred eight-five million generations removed) were fish!

In the archives, more videos about evolution, Neil deGrasse Tyson explains evolution, and a related must-watch video about our human history: Carl Sagan’s Cosmic Calendar from the original Cosmos.

From jtotheizzoe.

From PBS’ Adventures in Learning, Jennifer Cooper hosts an Electric Dough playdate to make and test circuits. For this project, developed by engineering educator AnnMarie Thomas, you’ll need homemade conductive play dough and insulating play dough, a battery pack, batteries (we highly recommend these rechargeables), and light emitting diodes/LEDS. Click here for the how-to details.

Related hands-on projects: LED Origami and Sick Science! Build a Lightbulb. Bonus: Circuit Playground’s A is for Ampere.

In this episode of Songs for Unusual Creatures, Michael Hearst visits the Los Angeles Zoo's Chinese Giant Salamander. This is the world’s largest salamander and the world’s largest extant amphibian, growing up to six feet long. It has a history that goes back 170 million years — that’s long before Tyrannosaurus Rex, who roamed the planet 67 to 65 million years ago, and way before the theremin and stylophone were invented.

Watch more Songs for Unusual Creatures and more videos with instruments in the archives.

And if you want your own, you’ll find the unusual Stylophone Retro Pocket Synth here.

This information-packed video from It’s Okay to Be Smart explains How The Elements Got Their Names in rhyme! It’s a great introduction for looking further into the periodic table’s rich history and etymology, from Actinium (Greek for “ray”) to Zirconium (Persian “zargun” or “gold-colored”).

For a deeper dive, definitely get Theodore Gray’s kid (and adult) friendly book The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe, and watch Gray introduce his massive collection in this video.

More: They Might Be Giants’ Meet the Elements and Tom Lehrer performs The Elements live — a must for any kid.

Via jtotheizzoe.