Russia

Showing 7 posts tagged Russia

What Does the World Eat for Breakfast — in Egypt, Vietnam, Sweden, or where you live? While these showcased morning foods are only some of the possible breakfasts in each of these countries, this Buzzfeed video is a solid conversation starter for introducing the variety of traditional food preferences around the globe.

In the archives: more food.

From The New York Times, Olympics 2014: The Science of Snowmaking

Machines make snow the same way nature does, by freezing water droplets. But they do it a few feet above the ground, rather than in the much colder conditions high in the atmosphere. Snowmaking machines employ a few thermodynamic tricks to help, but at times there is a limit to what physics can do…

…a droplet may not freeze entirely during the few seconds it takes to fall to the ground — what snowmakers call hang time.

“We’re basically making eggs,” Mr. Moulton said — icy shells around still-liquid centers.

Related snow videos: when nature handles it, How Is Snow Made?

Comparing different versions of familiar stories can be a great example of how many ways there are to see the world. The video above is a fascinating example: Winnie-the-Pooh (Винни-Пух, 1969) by Russian animator Fyodor Khitruk. From Open Culture

Created between 1969 and 1972, Khitruk’s three films star a bear named “Vinni-Pukh” who looks nothing like the Winnie the Pooh that Westerners grew up with. (You can see the original illustrations of Pooh by E.H. Shepard here.) But viewers will certainly recognize the storyline and spirit of the original Pooh in the Soviet adaptations. For decades, these films have enchanted East European viewers, both young and old. And they still occasionally appear on Russian TV.

It’s also fun to watch videos in another language. How much is communicated via context, patterns, intonations, and gestures? (You can also click the CC button at the bottom of the video for English subtitles.)

Watch Khitruk’s two other animations: Winnie-the-Pooh Goes on a Visit (Винни-Пух идет в гости, 1971) and Winnie-the-Pooh and the Day of Concern (Винни-Пух и день забот, 1972).

via Open Culture.

very big meteor burned up over Chelyabinsk, a city in Russia just east of the Ural mountains, and about 1500 kilometers east of Moscow. The fireball was incredibly bright, rivaling the Sun! There was a pretty big sonic boom from the fireball, which set off car alarms and shattered windows.

Slate’s Bad Astronomy blog continues to update with videos and photos as more information is revealed (and corrected). In the incredibly clear video above, you can see the meteor as it was recorded on February 15, 2013 by a dashboard camera.

UPDATE: video link replaced.

From the archives: What is a meteor? And how do we study them?

Via Climate Adaptation.