Tag: science

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Spectroscopy of Stars – Wonders of the Universe

Understand what the universe is made of by looking at the light of its stars. In this clip from Wonders of the Universe – Stardust, Professor Brian Cox demonstrates how chemical elements emit a unique set of colors wh...

NASA’s Rover of the Future

Omni-drive and suit ports will be just two of the NASA rover features available to future astronauts as they explore Mars or near-Earth asteroids. This Rover of the Future is an ever-evolving Space Exploration Vehicle...

ScienceTake: How an Embryo Grows

From a single cell to a whole organism, how do animals grow into such diverse and complex creatures from their embryonic beginnings? What if we could follow and map a human's development from a single cell to the esti...

Noodles & the principle of halving — The Ring of Truth: Atoms

Chef Kin Jing Mark demonstrates how to make super-thin noodles and helps introduce the principle of halving in this clip from the PBS miniseries The Ring of Truth: An Inquiry Into How We Know What We Know - Atoms (198...

ExpeRimental: Homemade Lava Lamp & Rubber Band Cannons

Explore the densities of liquids and household objects with Olympia Brown and her daughter Viola. This is episode two of ExpeRimental, a new science-at-home series by the Royal Institution of Great Britain that aims t...

The Physics Behind a Curveball – The Magnus Effect

What makes a curveball curve? How do soccer players (or football players internationally) bend the ball in the air? Physics! It's specifically called The Magnus Effect, "the commonly observed effect in which a spinnin...

How to Speak Chimpanzee

Hoping to assemble the world's first chimpanzee dictionary, primatologist Dr. Katja Liebal spends hours observing how different groups of chimpanzees communicate with each other. She believes that there is a language ...

Vermicomposting: How worms can reduce our waste

One third of food made in the world each year ends up in the trash can. How can we stop the waste by putting that food to good use? From TED Ed, learn how worms can naturally convert our organic waste — green leaves, ...

Why do ice cubes crack in drinks?

Here's an easy experiment: Take ice straight from the freezer and drop it in a glass of water. Listen and watch for the crack. Why does it do that? Professor Martyn Poliakoff of the Periodic Table of Videos team e...

Testing Fireworks

How do you know that the fireworks you've made are going to burst in the sky as expected? Test them! In this episode of I Didn't Know That, visit one of the UK's leading fireworks manufacturers as they test the compon...

The Solar Do-Nothing Machine by Charles and Ray Eames

Designed by husband and wife team Charles and Ray Eames, this is the Solar Do-Nothing Machine, a whimsy-maker of sorts, but also "one of the first devices to convert solar energy to electricity. The Eames office asked...

The Quest for Sea Ice: Swimming with polar bears and a camera

Follow a group of four polar bears as they swim in search of ice. Arctic Bear Productions filmmaker Adam Ravetch captured this footage by attaching a camera to one of the four animals. The big paws, the sun on the hor...

Testing a Space Rover Under Alaskan Ice

Someday it may be possible to explore below the icy surface of Jupiter's sixth-closest moon, Europa, and if this happens, it could be done with a technological descendant of this robotic rover: NASA JPL's Buoyant Rove...

Made with Code: Limor Fried and Erica Kochi

Adafruit's Limor Fried talks about why writing code is "like being able to write your own story in technology." As one of many women in science, tech, engineering, and math (STEM) careers, she's featured as a part of ...

How a locomotive works: GE Masterclass with Baratunde Thurston

In this promotional video series from General Electric, GE Masterclass with Baratunde Thurston, we go behind the scenes of GE's Global Research Center to explore engineering marvels, like how a freight locomotive work...

Fossil hunting in unexplored dinosaur country

This is what it's like to be a paleontologist out in the field, from waking at dawn's first light, to digging in the rocks, to wrapping or jacketing finds, to gathering around the campfire, exhausted and covered with ...

It’s Okay to Be Smart – The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You

From PBS Digital Studios and Joe Hanson of It's Okay to Be Smart, this is The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You, a visualized explanation for what happens when we breathe. And here it is explained: via It's Oka...

Paralyzed Woman Controls Robotic Arm With Thoughts

When Cathy Hutchinson controlled a robotic arm using a small sensor planted in her brain, it was a remarkable breakthrough in neurobiology and computer science. The sensor would recognize patterns or signals from her ...

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