Topic: air

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The 3-million-year old Ningwu ice cave never thaws

White stalactites hang down from every surface, and the walls and floors are glazed with thick ice. The Ningwu ice cave, also referred to as Wannian Ice Cave in Ningwu County, China, is a unique phenomenon: The subter...

Science Extras from Jiwi’s (Rube Goldberg) Machines

A YouTube series that hearkens back to characters and situations from old silent films, Jiwi's Machines mixes a love for Rube Goldberg Machines with an ode to comedy greats like Charlie Chaplin or Buster Keaton. T...

What happens when you put marshmallows in a vacuum?

Thanks to this hand pump vacuum sealer demo, we can see how these four fluffy marshmallows will react when the air is pumped out of their clear container. Poof, poof, poof! What's going on here? From Physics.org: ...

The origin of the dancing inflatable tube man

Where did those dancing inflatable men, called AirDancers or "tall boys", originally come from? Trinidadian Carnival artist Peter Minshall created these long-armed, long-legged, exuberant dancers -- plastic, body-shap...

Tiny engines made with paper

Behold engineer Aliaksei Zholner's working V8 engine, made entirely with paper (and he notes, "some scotch tape on valves to eliminate friction"). At 32 x 24 x 27 mm, it is tiny, as is this paper throttle: Zho...

Annotated time lapse assembly of a wind turbine

From excavation to operation, it takes three weeks to install a wind turbine. Watch it happen in under six minutes in this wind turbine promo video from MidAmerican Energy, filled with facts layered on time lapse foot...

How a Space Suit Works – with Helen Sharman

Chemist Helen Sharman was the first British astronaut in space, and as a part of Project Juno in 1991, was the first woman to visit the Mir space station. In the video above, Sharman gives us a mini-tour of the space ...

Morske Orgulje – The Sea Organ in Zadar, Croatia

There is an unpredictable and beautiful-sounding Sea Organ, or Morske Orgulje, located on the edge of the Adriatic Sea in Zadar, Croatia. The 35 pipe ocean current instrument was built along the city's promenade in 20...

Meet the Balloonatics – SciFri goes to Macy’s Parade Studio

How are Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade balloons designed, calculated, fabricated, tested, and retested before they show up on the streets of Manhattan on Thanksgiving morning? From Science Friday in 2011, visit the 'b...

Macro Video of Iridescent Soap Bubbles – Stereokroma

The next time you get the opportunity to blow some soap bubbles, be sure to take a long, close look at them. Those ever-changing rainbows sliding around across the surfaces of the bubbles can be spellbinding... like a...

Why do spinning rings & spinning disks have different paths?

In this silent video from Science Magazine, we can see how a spinning disk and a ring create two different paths while spinning. Try it at home. Do you see the same result? David Schultz at ScienceMag.org explains: ...

Why Do We Put Telescopes in Space? – MinutePhysics

If we have excellent telescopes here on Earth, why is it so important to put telescopes like the Hubble Space Telescope into space? This MinutePhysics video explains the challenges of being an earthbound telescope, fr...

Rock Swing Cup & more DIY playground physics

Next time you're on the swings, think about what it might be like if you were swinging on the moon, free from air resistance. AP Physics teacher Jared Keester had that in mind during this experiment: Swing jumping wit...

How to Make a Cloud in Your Mouth – Physics Girl

To make a cloud in your mouth -- yes, this is a very cool trick that actually works with practice -- you'll need to make tiny water droplets in your mouth. Then up the pressure. Physics Girl Dianna Cowern demonstrates...

Surprising Applications of the Magnus Effect – Veritasium

When you drop a basketball from a great height, in this case, 415 feet (126.5 m) off of Tasmania's Gordon Dam, the basketball will generally fall down into the area below where it was dropped. But what happens when yo...

Resonance, forced vibration, and a tuning forks demo

A U-shaped fork of steel first invented in 1711 by trumpet player John Shore, the tuning fork is a tool produces a specific note that helps musicians keep their instruments in tune. They also are a great conversation ...

How Do Greenhouse Gases Actually Work?

The Earth and the Moon are essentially the same distance from the sun, yet the two rocks have very different surfaces thanks to our Earth's atmosphere. It shields us during the day, and at night, it traps enough heat ...

What’s the Loudest Possible Sound? – It’s Okay to Be Smart

"What is the loudest possible sound? What about the quietest thing we can hear? And what do decibels measure, anyway?" This video from Joe Hanson and It's Okay to Be Smart dives into the wide ranging and incredibly se...

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