airplane

Showing 10 posts tagged airplane

Above, filmmaker Cy Kuckenbaker's Midday Traffic Time Collapsed and Reorganized by Color: San Diego Study #3. But wait… here’s the real video of this freeway. So what’s going on here, and how did he do it? Via The Creator’s Project

Using a system called chroma key (that acts in several ways like a green screen) Kuckenbaker was able to remove, re-insert, and layer both backgrounds and objects—giving the appearance of remarkable mass action happening in a short time frame. Through this method, he was able to isolate car patterns and condense their cycles—turning what would otherwise be dry transportation data into a moving, visual representation of life in San Diego.

You may have also seen Kuckenbaker’s viral airplanes, Landings at San Diego Int Airport Nov 23, 2012, below: 

In the archive: more vehicles and more swarms.

We want to learn how to make flying vehicles like this. Meet Luigi Prina, the 83-Year-Old Builder of Flying Model Ships, in this fascinating video profile: The Ships That Sail Through The Clouds

The flying ships are made from ultrathin paper and balsa wood. Everything is optimized for flight: from the weight (between 20 and 50 grams) to the aerodynamic shape. They fly like any propeller airplane. The only difference is that here the propeller is powered by an internal elastic band and not an engine.

Photo by Gianluca Giannone. Read more about Luigi Prina at Blinking City.

Related must-watch videos: a rubber-band-powered paper robotan RC Flapttera kite-like wind sculpture, a human-powered helicopter, and a great science class project: DIY walkalong gliders

via Colossal.

This animation project by Pingo van der Brinkloev is titled It’s Paper, despite not being paper at all. From the artist: 

I wanted to make some infinite loops for istockphoto and I wanted to make a paper shader. The finished clips are actually only 4-5 seconds long but they can go on for ever… Everything is straight out of cinema4d.

Visually related watching: Paper City by Maciek Janicki. And more paper projects.

via booooooom.

An invisible but universal phenomena, huge wingtip vortices can be seen in the twisting fog as this airplane lands in Zurich, Switzerland. Wingtip vortices are strong spirals of air that are created when high pressure air below the wing spills up around the top of the wing, a relatively lower air pressure space, making a small horizontal tornado.

Read more about wingtip vortices and vortex drag at howthingsfly.si.edu.

via Science Demo.