Topic: american museum of natural history

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Why are museum collections so important? Sir David Attenborough explains

Museums like the American Museum of Natural History may, at first, seem to be sharing their entire scientific collections in the public displays of their grand halls, but when scientists need specimens for research, t...

The Squid and the Whale: Evidence for an Epic Encounter

One of the most famous dioramas in the American Museum of Natural History depicts a battle between two gigantic animals: the sperm whale and giant squid. But unlike most dioramas in the Museum’s halls, this scene has ...

The Amazing Shapes of Ammonites

Now extinct, ammonites are abundant, prehistoric sea molluscs that first appeared in the fossil record around 240 million years ago. The images of ammonites that we often see in museums and books are planispiral-shape...

Dinosaurs Among Us – AMNH

Dinosaur nests, eggs, and babies, dinosaur feathers, dinosaur brains and lungs, and dinosaur bones, beaks, and claws all provide evidence that birds are living dinosaurs. In this video from the American Museum of Natu...

Meet the Titanosaur at AMNH

A mighty Titanosaur, the recently-discovered herbivore that measures 37.186 meters (122 feet) long, now stands on the fourth floor of New York City's American Museum of Natural History. Its discovery is so recent (201...

AMNH: Shelf Life – Skull of the Olinguito

How was a ninety year old specimen "hiding in plain sight" before it was rescued from storage at The Field Museum and celebrated in 2013 as a newly-identified species? This episode of The American Museum of Natural Hi...

AMNH: Shelf Life – Six Ways To Prepare a Coelacanth

The Coelacanth, pronounced see-luh-kanth, is a prehistoric-looking fish that scientists thought had gone extinct 66 to 80 million years ago, until one was discovered in a fisherman's haul near the Chalumna River by So...

AMNH: Shelf Life – Turtles and Taxonomy

The science of classification, specifically the biological taxonomy of organisms, organizes how humans see and study the life that surrounds us. For museum-goers, observing a turtle skull, seaweed leaves, or a cabinet...

AMNH Origami: Fold a Jumping Frog in 13 Easy Steps

In celebration of the American Museum of Natural History's annual Origami Holiday Tree, a 40 year tradition, the museum has released a series of short origami-making videos. Above, how to fold a jumping frog from an i...

AMNH: Shelf Life – 33 Million Things

What if you could open up a drawer full of hundreds of pinned insect specimens to study them under a microscope, or unscrew the jar cap to scan a curious creature that swam in the deep sea decades ago? For collectors ...

Building a True-to-Life Butterfly for a Habitat Diorama – AMNH

The next time that you’re in your local natural history museum, don’t just look at the large animals in the dioramas — really look for those hidden small animals, too: a brow...

Space Weather: Storms from the Sun

If the next generation is aware of space weather like we currently check Earth weather, I wouldn’t be surprised. We're already paying attention to solar flares, CMEs (coronal mass ejec...

AMNH: The Known Universe

The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is...

Whales Give Dolphins a Lift

Many species interact in the wild, most often as predator and prey. But recent encounters between humpback whales and bottlenose dolphins reveal a playful side to interspecies interaction. In two different locations...


 
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