animation

Showing 213 posts tagged animation

Travel back in time to Ancient Greece where revolutionary thinkers – from Thales, Pythagoras, Democritus and Aristotle to Euclid, Archimedes, and Hypatia of Alexandria – helped define the rules and language of mathematics.

For Greek thinkers, maths wasn’t simply a means of calculating amounts but a way of testing reality and understanding the true nature of the world around them. Indeed, Pythagoras is believed to have coined both the words “philosophy” (“love of wisdom”) and “mathematics” (“that which is learned”).

From the Ri Channel, Phoebe Halstead, and 12foot6, this is the two-minute story of math’s great Greek Legacy: How the Ancient Greeks shaped modern mathematics.

Yay, math! Previously from the Ri Channel: the animated adventure of x-ray crystallography.

Thanks, @cawston and @benjohnbarnes.

In 1961, an interactive exhibition called Mathematica: A World of Numbers… and Beyond inaugurated the new science wing at Los Angeles’ California Museum of Science and Industry. Sponsored by IBM, it was an innovative exhibit designed by husband and wife team Charles and Ray Eames, and lucky for us, it included five short animations that explored a handful of math concepts. Watch three of our favorites:

Above, 2ⁿ – “a story about the exponential growth of numbers raised to powers.” Below, Symmetry and testing for degrees of it:

Also, Topology – how a closed curve dissects a plane into inside and outside sections:

And in the archives, don’t miss this iconic Eames film: Powers of Ten.

via Tinybop.

From the team at Kurzgesagt, let’s explore what we know about The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang:

Has the universe a beginning or was it here since forever? Well, evidence suggests that there was indeed a starting point to this universe we are part of right now. But how can this be? How can something come from nothing? And what about time? We don’t have all the answers yet so let’s talk about what we know. 

Previously on this site: Take a trip through The Solar System — our home in space, plus more about The Big Bang, including Carl Sagan’s cosmic calendar and the last five minutes of How the Universe Works: Extreme Stars.

Thanks, Philipp.