art

Showing 118 posts tagged art

For ten days in a Pierogi Gallery space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, artists Ward Shelley and Alex Schweder lived in “a giant hamster wheel,” a large installation called In Orbit. From Animal New York

This is the fourth collaboration between Shelley and Schweder in a series they call “The Social Relationship Architecture Project.” Each time they’ve built a different dwelling space that requires them to work together in order to live. This time, they’ve arranged the various components and furnishings of a home on a giant wheel. “In Orbit is a two bedroom apartment, in a sense,” Schweder says. “One is on the inside and one on the outside.”

In the archives: more art installationsmore architecture and more wheels, including the Event of a Thread, la casa ecológica de botellas, and the unusual Dynasphere.

via Design Boom.

Have you ever seen the makings of a face on an inanimate object? Did you have any googly eyes handy at the time? As we’ve featured before, eyebombing" or "vandaleyes-ing" is when you add googly eyes to something, creating a face that wasn’t quite there before. Nuria Pérez Paredes and her daughters fell in love with the idea and recently took to the streets for some Eyebombing in Madrid. Thanks to the video above, we get to come along…

In the archives: visit Spain.

Thanks, Nuria.

Bending on almost-invisible hinges, Ghostcube is a system of wooden cubes that can create different structures depending on how they’re twisted and rearranged. They’re made by Stockholm-based artist Erik Åberg.

If you’ve seen Brusspup’s Amazing Moving Cube tutorial, then you’ll have an idea about how Ghostcube may have been constructed, and how you can DIY something similar. Get started!

via Viral Viral Videos.

When this flight paths of starlings video by artist and professor Dennis Hlynsky went viral, it sparked a lot of questions for us: How did he make the visualizations? How do the starlings move quickly as a flock? What makes other groups of animals move the way they do?

In Micromigrations from The Atlantic, Hlynsky discusses his own questions as we observe the water striders, ants, starlings, vultures, crows, and little white flying bugs that continue to inspire his curiosity and his work.

Watch starlings videos and explore more about the way animals (and robots) move, including water striders, cheetahs, catssnakes, and hummingbirds.

Thanks, Sam.