Topic: atoms

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Explore the Science Behind Fireworks—and the Galaxy

When you watch fireworks burst with color, you're seeing examples of how stars and galaxies work: Blues from copper, yellows from sodium, bright whites from aluminum, barium greens, and reds made from strontium... The...

The science of static electricity – TED Ed

What is static electricity? Why do we get a tiny spark when we've walked across a carpet and touched a doorknob? Or have you ever pet a cat and then picked up something metal, like a spoon to stir up cat food? Zap! (A...

The Electric Sausage: A static electricity demonstration

Perhaps you've experimented with static electricity by using a balloon, paper clippings, your hair, a pencil, a plastic bag, or a Van de Graaff Generator... but have you ever used a sausage to see static electricity i...

How Small Is An Atom?

Using a strand of hair, your fist, rice and sand grains, as well as the room you're sitting in right now (assuming it's not a huge gymnasium), let's try to visualize the basic building block of everything around us: A...

The Ring of Truth: Two Hydrogen Atoms & One Oxygen Atom

Possibly the most well-known scientific formula on the planet, H2O is one of those terms that we see around all the time. We know that H2O means water, and that a water molecule is composed of two hydrogen (H) atoms &...

Eva Szasz’s Cosmic Zoom (1968)

From director Eva Szasz and the National Film Board of Canada, Cosmic Zoom (1968) is a wordless journey that attempts to demonstrate the scale of the universe. Beginning with a boy boating on the Ottawa River, we trav...

The Ring of Truth: Noodles & the principle of halving

Chef Kin Jing Mark demonstrates how to make super-thin noodles and helps introduce the principle of halving in this clip from the PBS miniseries The Ring of Truth: An Inquiry Into How We Know What We Know - Atoms (198...

The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You – It’s Okay to Be Smart

From PBS Digital Studios and Joe Hanson of It's Okay to Be Smart, this is The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You, a visualized explanation for what happens when we breathe. And here it is explained: via It's Oka...

The Beginning of Everything: The Big Bang

From the team at Kurzgesagt, let’s explore what we know about The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang: Has the universe a beginning or was it here since forever? Well, evidence ...

The Ring of Truth: Molten gold transforms into gold leaf

Above, watch molten gold transform into gold leaf as it is beaten into thinner and thinner pieces while cold. This clip is from PBS’ six-part miniseries The Ring of Truth: An Inquiry I...

Celebrating Crystallography: An adventure in structural analysis

One of the great innovations of the twentieth century is likely not well-known, but this video from the Ri Channel is looking to change that: This is X-ray crystallography.  Discovered in 1913 by William and Lawren...

HeadSqueeze: Why Do Hot Things Glow?

Why Do Hot Things Glow? HeadSqueeze's Greg Foot answers the question with a bit of animated help. There are more atoms and a diverse set of vibration videos in the archives.  Thanks, John Oxton-King.

A Boy And His Atom: The World’s Smallest Movie

Magnifying carbon monoxide (CO) atoms to over 100 million times their actual size, arranging them into a series of 242 still images, and then animating them together, scientists at IBM Researc...

Ice Cores – Measuring Earth’s atmosphere from 20,000 years ago

When you drill 364 meters (1194 feet) down into Antarctic ice, taking out a cylindrical section called an ice core, you can measure the Earth's temperature and carbon dioxide levels from over 20,000 years ago. Infor...

Melody Sheep: Our Story in 1 Minute

Our Story in 1 Minute: A tapestry of footage tracing the cosmic and biological origins of our species, set to original music. 

TED Ed: Just how small is an atom?

What is an atom and exactly how small is it again? And what’s in it? And how can I understand that in practical, everyday terms? — Grab a bowl of blueberries to snack on and we’re on our way with thi...

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson: The Most Astounding Fact

Astrophysicist Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson was asked by a reader of TIME magazine, “What is the most astounding fact you can share with us about the Universe?” This is his answer. ...

Levitating frogs using magnetic fields

Flying Frogs! Sort of… The short answer is that living things — even humans — can levitate when a ridiculously strong/large magnet is used to repel the frog’s atoms’...

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