babies

Showing 52 posts tagged babies

Today’s daily dose of adorable comes from the Toronto Zoo in this clip of a 2-month old polar bear cub taking his first steps. The sole surviving bear in a litter of three, the cub has been living in the zoo’s intensive care unit since just after his birth so that his health could be monitored. He has since grown stronger and continues to reach new milestones, such as eating from a dish:

He also makes cute noises while sleeping:

"Our Wildlife Care Team has been working around the clock to look after this special cub. We are very happy with his progress so far. We hope that he will grow up to become another ambassador for his species, highlighting threats to the arctic environment," says Dr. Graham Crawshaw, a veterinarian at the zoo.

Polar bears are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

via CBC News.

Baby river otters don’t know how to swim when they’re born! In this April 2013 video from the Oregon Zoo, meet Molalla the Baby River Otter and his mother Tilly as she gives him a few lessons.

"It might look kind of scary to a casual observer," (keeper Becca) Van Beek said. “She’ll grab Mo by the scruff of the neck and dunk him in the water. But that’s a very natural behavior. Baby otters are extremely buoyant, so Mo has built-in water wings for his swim lessons. This is how baby otters learn to swim, and it’s exactly what we’ve been hoping to see.”

Related reading: sea otter vs river otter. Then watch videos of more babies and a few more otters.

Thanks, Michael.

In this episode of Songs for Unusual Creatures, Michael Hearst visits the Frog Pod at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, and then collaborates with glass armonica player Cecilia Brauer on a new song for the amazing little glass frog.

We love glass armonica and glass frog videos. Watch more Songs for Unusual Creatures, more frogs, and more instruments in the archives.

"Jaguars are already one of the world’s most endangered species, but one of the two cubs on display at Zacango Zoo in Mexico is even more rare because it is melanistic. That means the animal appears completely black, although you can actually see spots if you look carefully. The two cubs were bred from different mothers and they’re the first of their kind to be born at the zoo for a decade."

From ITN, a report on the small big cats, including a rare black jaguar cub, at Zoologico de Zacango in Mexico. 

Previously: baby animal friends at Akwaaba Lodge, more cats of all sizes, and more zoo videos.