bacteria

Showing 6 posts tagged bacteria

Where might we find life in our solar system? Via skeptvScientific American Space Lab has a countdown for that: Top 5 Places to Look for Alien LifeBonus — the video comes with additional reading material:  

Is There Life on Venus?

Venus May Have Had Continents and Oceans

Was Venus Alive? ‘The Signs Are Probably There’

Tiny Saturn Moon ID’d As Good Candidate For Alien Life

Planet Profile for Titan

The Europa Report: A Report

Mars vs. Europa: Are we looking in the wrong place for alien life?

Mars Rover Finds Evidence of Ancient Habitability

Next Mars Rover Will Seek Out Signs of Past Life

Follow this up with Brian Cox's favorite wonder, Saturn’s largest moon: Titan.

From medicalschool, watch this time lapse clip of how bacteria reproduce by dividing into two every 20 minutes. 

Bacteria are microscopic single-cell organisms that are found in the air, inside and on our bodies, in the dirt, and everywhere in nature. There are both harmful and beneficial kinds. Some cause diseases, while others help our bodies function. For example, there are more than 400 types of bacteria live in the human digestive system. There are also kinds that are used to make medicines, and others that make foods like cheese and yogurt. (Might anyone know what kind of bacteria this is?)

More mentions of bacteria are in these videos.

What does it look like underneath a lake covered with Antarctic ice? McGill University doctoral student and scientific diver Michael Becker shares the view in this New York Times video under Lake Untersee, Antarctica.

In the blog post, he also explains the prep behind keeping the dive safe — note that yellow tether that keeps divers in communication with their team and leads them back to safety — and what they are looking for in the lake sediment: precisely described data and carefully collected samples that help illuminate the history of the lake and its organisms. Brrrrr.

from Scientist at Work.

Every gut microbe has a job to do. Find out who these millions of different microbes are and what their jobs are within the ecosystem that is you, from the wonderful TEDEd. Full lesson here.

jtotheizzoe:

You Are Your Microbes

Sure, you feel human, but that’s only mostly right. In and on your body, you’re outnumbered by ten times when it comes to microbes. And many of them have essential duties that we just couldn’t do by ourselves. Here’s a trip through your microbial inner universe … what we call the “microbiome”.

A lesson by Jessica Green and Karen Guillemin for TEDEducation.

PreviouslyThe family tree of your microbiome, the “kitten microbiome” and more.

And don’t miss this Radiolab episode all about Guts.

So how does one make cheese? We know cheese is made from the milk of cows and goats, for example, but then what happens?

From the book, How Did That Get In My Lunchbox, we know a bit, but the video above showed some of the steps in action: 

A farmer milked the cows, and a tanker from the dairy came to collect the milk.

1. In the dairy, cheese makers warmed up the milk…

2. …and added bacteria to make it turn sour and thick.

3. Then they added a substance that animals use to digest milk called rennet…

4. …and it changed again into bits called curds, floating in whey.

5. They drained off the whey, chopped up the rubbery curds, added some salt, and pressed them into blocks.

6. They stored the blocks for months until the cheese was ripe. 

Many cheeses also use rennet alternatives, like vegetable rennet, microbial rennet or citric acid. Fresh cheeses like cream cheese, chevre, paneer, ricotta and mozzarella, can be eaten right away. Other cheeses are aged (like in these videos). Aging the cheese can take anywhere from a month for Monterey Jack, to 6 weeks for Camemberts and Bries, 3-6 months for Blue Cheese,  and 12 months for some parmesans. Some cheeses take even longer! 

Clearly, we fell down a cheese-making rabbit hole. These cheese flipping robots (specifically Gruyere-flipping robots) in Switzerland started it! Via Kottke: