bear

Showing 12 posts tagged bear

When camping, it’s good to know how to enjoy nature while keeping nature protected and out of your stuff. With this in mind, grizzly bears Ozzy and Bruno team up with ZooMontana keeper Krystal Whetham to demonstrate how easy it is for bears to wreck a campsite when campers leave food around.

Related reading: Make Your Food Bear Safe When Camping

Also: watch more bears and see what they like to do when humans aren’t around.

via Devour.

The next time that you’re in your local natural history museum, don’t just look at the large animals in the dioramas — really look for those hidden small animals, too: a brown-headed cowbird near a bison, a Botta’s pocket gopher peeking from a burrow, or a Blue Echo Butterfly on a flower. These smaller details in scenes get as much attention from museum staff as the central figures. 

Above, the American Museum of Natural History's Conservation Fellow Bethany Palumbo describes how she studied museum specimens of the Blue Echo to recreate it using a mix of photocopying, hand painting, and sculpting with layers of glue.

New York’s AMNH made a series of excellent videos about their dioramas from their 2012 restoration efforts

Every detail was studied for accuracy, down to the cougar’s whisker texture:

Even the shadows, background paintings, and native grasses demand proper attention to detail. After new, energy-efficient lights were installed, museum artist Stephen C. Quinn even altered the slight color variations of the crushed marble dust “snow” to better represent the moon shadows in the Wolf Diorama

Related watching: Ancient Ancestors Come to Life, How to Make a Large Crocodile Sculpture, Anatomy of Preservation, and Paleontology 101.

h/t Sagan Sense.

Comparing different versions of familiar stories can be a great example of how many ways there are to see the world. The video above is a fascinating example: Winnie-the-Pooh (Винни-Пух, 1969) by Russian animator Fyodor Khitruk. From Open Culture

Created between 1969 and 1972, Khitruk’s three films star a bear named “Vinni-Pukh” who looks nothing like the Winnie the Pooh that Westerners grew up with. (You can see the original illustrations of Pooh by E.H. Shepard here.) But viewers will certainly recognize the storyline and spirit of the original Pooh in the Soviet adaptations. For decades, these films have enchanted East European viewers, both young and old. And they still occasionally appear on Russian TV.

It’s also fun to watch videos in another language. How much is communicated via context, patterns, intonations, and gestures? (You can also click the CC button at the bottom of the video for English subtitles.)

Watch Khitruk’s two other animations: Winnie-the-Pooh Goes on a Visit (Винни-Пух идет в гости, 1971) and Winnie-the-Pooh and the Day of Concern (Винни-Пух и день забот, 1972).

via Open Culture.

In the Inuit mythology, « Tuurngait » are the spirits that play tricks to humans. To succeed, they often adopt the physical appearance of an animal…

Adventure with an Inuit child and a wild bird in Tuurngait, an award-winning film short directed by five students from Arles’ Supinfocom in France. And if you have 3D glasses, put them on and watch this version on YouTube.

There are more great snow videos in the archives — travel through Greenland on a dog sled, sit in hot springs with Japanese Macaques, freeze boiling water in Russia, or learn how to build an Inuit igloo.

via Vimeo.