Tag: biology

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ScienceTake: How an Embryo Grows

From a single cell to a whole organism, how do animals grow into such diverse and complex creatures from their embryonic beginnings? What if we could follow and map a human's development from a single cell to the esti...

It’s Okay to Be Smart – The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You

From PBS Digital Studios and Joe Hanson of It's Okay to Be Smart, this is The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You, a visualized explanation for what happens when we breathe. And here it is explained: via It's Oka...

Spiders Tune Their Webs Like A Guitar

Much more than just a net to catch prey, spider webs can transmit lots of information about what has been caught or what might be visiting. Oxford researchers have recently discovered that the strands of silk vibrate ...

TED Ed: How does the heart pump blood?

"For most of history, humans had no idea what purpose the heart served... although everyone could feel their own heart beating, it wasn't always clear what each thump was achieving... Even in the 21st century, only a ...

This is how an echidna hatches from an egg

This is how an echidna or spiny anteater, a mammal, hatches from an egg. In this 1974 amazing csiro clip from a film called Comparative Biology of Lactation, we also get to see how milk can be seen in its tiny, transp...

Cell vs. virus: A battle for health

From TED Ed and Shannon Stiles, Cell vs. virus: A battle for health:  All living things are made of cells. In the human body, these highly efficient units are protected by layer upon layer of defense against i...

Sugar: Hiding in plain sight

We know that sugar is a big part of candy, ice cream, and sweet drinks, but did you know that added sugars are included in 3/4 of the 600,000+ products found in the average grocery store? And...

It’s Okay to Be Smart: Who was the first human?

The question “Who was the first human?” was a very popular one in our house just last year, but the evolution videos we had in the archives – even the awesome – didn’t answer ...

TED Ed: The Mystery of Motion Sickness

One out of three people get motion sick, yet it’s not something we can really cure, only relieve. So what exactly is going on inside of our bodies when this happens? If you liked Head Sq...

Head Squeeze: Why do we get car sick?

Why do we get car sick? Sea sick? Air sick? Greg Foot of Head Squeeze explains. And here’s some related reading on ginger. Related videos: more brains! via Devour.

Biodegradable mushroom packaging from Ecovative Designs

What if we could replace plastics and styrofoam with something much more sustainable? Something that wouldn’t fill our landfills, pollute our beaches, or float out into our ocean gyres? ...

The Animated Life of A.R. Wallace

This incredible animation by Flora Lichtman and Sharon Shattuck chronicles the story of British naturalist, anthropologist, biologist, geographer, and intrepid adventurer Alfred Russel Wallace, who was als...

TED Ed: How many smells can you identify?

How many smells can you identify? Which ones are your favorites and which ones do you really not like? Stop and make a list, because it’ll be an amazingly long and diverse list. As it ...

Planet Paraguay: Four-Toed Whiptail Lizard (Teius Teyou)

Check out this bright green and blue Four-Toed Whiptail Lizard, Teius Teyou, a common animal in the grassy sands of Paraguay, South America. Biologist Dr Jonny Miller introduces the reptile, n...

Science Friday: The Other Golden Rule

Physiology, gravity, and fluid dynamics all come together in The Other Golden Rule from Science Friday. Learn how videos, data, equations, and fieldwork with creatures great and small helped re...

The koala’s deep voice

Body mass and vocal pitch don’t always match. Male koalas have deep, rumbling vocalizations, an unexpectedly low sound that might normally be associated with wild boars or a huge brayin...

Thailand’s Moken people have incredibly clear underwater vision

In this extraordinary adaptation strategy, Thailand’s Moken sea gypsies can see twice as clearly underwater by controlling the size of their pupils. What was generally considered an automatic reflex for the res...

Onward: Searching for Life in Iceland’s Frigid Fissures

In Onward: Searching for Life in Iceland’s Frigid Fissures, National Geographic grantee and biology researcher Jónína Ólafsdóttir goes diving in search of tiny arthropods in the underwater volcanic fissures of ...

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