Topic: biology

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How your digestive system works

Across the planet, humans eat on average between 1 and 2.7 kilograms of food a day, and every last scrap makes its way through the digestive system. Comprised of ten organs covering nine meters, this is one of the mos...

Becoming Visible: Shattering stereotypes & misconceptions in science

The University of Florida's Florida Museum of Natural History celebrated 100 years of inspiring people to care about life on Earth in 2017. To mark the closing of an era and the beginning of a new century, UF News pro...

How glow-in-the-dark jellyfish inspired a scientific revolution

In science, ideas are kind of like seeds. If you're lucky, a seed will grow and expand the boundaries of human knowledge. But it's hard to know which seeds will take root. Take any invention or modern innovation and i...

Why (and how) do whales sing?

Whale vocalizations are a bit of a mystery. We know that only the males of some baleen whales sing, but we're not sure what those compositions—specifically structured phrases and melodies that repeat and evolve within...

How the Animal Kingdom Sleeps & How Animals See the World – Animalism

Sleep is universal in the animal kingdom, but each species slumbers in a different — and often mysterious — way. Some animals snooze with half their brain, while others only sleep for two hours a day (without even suf...

Barred Owl Chick Regurgitates Pellets – Incredible Close Up

Barred owls can be found throughout the eastern United States and Canada, and have more recently expanded their habitat into Alberta, British Columbia, and the American northwest. They roost quietly during the day and...

Into the Deep Unknown with deep sea biologist Diva Amon

In the summer of 2017, a team of scientists led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution ventured a thousand kilometers off the coast of Brazil to explore the seafloor around a little-known cluster of islets called...

How A Children’s Toy Led To An Essential Medical Device

"We were out in a primary health center talking to health care workers [in Uganda] and we found a centrifuge used as a doorstop because there's no electricity." The workers said that they really needed a powerful cent...

How does your body know you’re full?

Hunger claws at your belly. It tugs at your intestines, which begin to writhe, aching to be fed. Being hungry generates a powerful and often unpleasant physical sensation that’s almost impossible to ignore. After you’...

How a kingfisher, an owl, & a penguin helped redesign Japan’s Shinkansen

How is Japan’s Shinkansen, a long-nosed bullet train that travels up to 240–320 km/h (150–200 mph), like a kingfisher? Or an owl? Or an Adélie penguin? In this video from Vox and 99% Invisible, we see how these three ...

Fred Harwin hand paints highly detailed prosthetic eyes

Portland, Oregon-based ocularist Fred Harwin makes beautifully detailed artificial eyes, an occupation that requires both medical and illustrative expertise. In this video from Oregon Public Broadcasting, Harwin share...

The Anomalies: The Acorn Woodpecker

As their name implies, acorn woodpeckers rely heavily on acorns for sustenance. To make sure this seasonal resource remains available throughout the year, the birds build enormous “granaries” by drilling thousands of ...

Invisible Nature: Return of the Wood Frog

The common wood frog (Rana sylvatica) has an unusual strategy for coping with the cold. While most terrestrial frogs and toads burrow deep underground to escape freezing temperatures when they hibernate, the wood frog...

A tiny newborn kangaroo climbs into its mother’s pouch

As marsupials, kangaroos have pouches called marsupiums that provide nourishment and protection for their undeveloped young. When a kangaroo mother gives birth, her blind, jellybean-sized newborn must climb up into th...

Do jellyfish sleep?

At first glance, humans seem to have very little in common with Cassiopea, a primitive jellyfish. Cassiopea is brainless, spineless, and spends essentially its entire life sitting upside down on the ocean floor, pulsa...

How to harvest honey

How is honey harvested from a bee hive? British tv presenter and science 'edutuber' Maddie Moate spends the day with her mother, a beekeeper, to collect a few honey-filled frames from their two hives. This How to Harv...

Why are museum collections so important? Sir David Attenborough explains

Museums like the American Museum of Natural History may, at first, seem to be sharing their entire scientific collections in the public displays of their grand halls, but when scientists need specimens for research, t...

Three quarters of deep-sea animals are bioluminescent

Thanks to advancing camera technology and diligent scientific research, scientists have learned that bioluminescence is not the unusual attribute that we thought it was. Researchers Séverine Martini and Steven H. D. H...

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