Tag: biology

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Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of vibrantly-colored coral camouflage

The vibrant colors of thumbnail-sized Pygmy Seahorses have always been aligned with the brilliant oranges or purples of the Gorgonian sea fan corals that they're found camouflaged with, but until biologists at San Fra...

The Animal That Wouldn’t Die: The Hydra

Just a few millimeters long and full of embryonic cells, the hydra is a small and mysterious cnidarian polyp that seems to defy mortality. Skunk Bear's Adam Cole and Robert Krulwich team up to tell the amazing tale of...

NOVA PBS: Immunity and Vaccines Explained

Why do we get shots when visiting the doctor? How do vaccines work with our immune systems to keep us from getting sick? From NOVA PBS: Immunity and Vaccines Explained. Our bodies are bombarded by bacteria and ...

Shake Your Silk-Maker: The Dance of the Peacock Spider

When a peacock spider dances, how do we know that it's a really, really good dancer? From their colorful, iridescent body displays, to their wide variety of dance moves, to the different rhythms that they "sing" while...

Animated Life: Seeing the Invisible

"Everything that you can actually see with your eye is just the smallest sliver of life on this Earth. Most of life is invisible..." And so begins the exquisite paper-puppetry of Seeing the Invisible, a video by F...

Feedback loops: How nature gets its rhythms

A grasshopper eats grass, a rat can eat the grasshopper, a snake may eat the rat, and a hawk will eat the snake. When these food chains interweave, they create a food web. Plants and animals (including humans) live, e...

ScienceTake: For Kangaroos, Tail Becomes a Fifth Leg

What makes a leg a leg? What if a leg is a kangaroo tail? In a recent study, scientists observed, recorded, and measured data for five red kangaroos that were trained to walk slowly on a force-measuring platform. T...

ScienceTake: How an Embryo Grows

From a single cell to a whole organism, how do animals grow into such diverse and complex creatures from their embryonic beginnings? What if we could follow and map a human's development from a single cell to the esti...

It’s Okay to Be Smart – The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You

From PBS Digital Studios and Joe Hanson of It's Okay to Be Smart, this is The Cycle: Carbon and Oxygen and You, a visualized explanation for what happens when we breathe. And here it is explained: via It's Oka...

Spiders Tune Their Webs Like A Guitar

Much more than just a net to catch prey, spider webs can transmit lots of information about what has been caught or what might be visiting. Oxford researchers have recently discovered that the strands of silk vibrate ...

TED Ed: How does the heart pump blood?

"For most of history, humans had no idea what purpose the heart served... although everyone could feel their own heart beating, it wasn't always clear what each thump was achieving... Even in the 21st century, only a ...

This is how an echidna hatches from an egg

This is how an echidna or spiny anteater, a mammal, hatches from an egg. In this amazing 1974 CSIRO clip from a film called Comparative Biology of Lactation, we also get to see how milk can be seen in its tiny, transp...

Cell vs. virus: A battle for health

From TED Ed and Shannon Stiles, Cell vs. virus: A battle for health:  All living things are made of cells. In the human body, these highly efficient units are protected by layer upon layer of defense against i...

Sugar: Hiding in plain sight

We know that sugar is a big part of candy, ice cream, and sweet drinks, but did you know that added sugars are included in 3/4 of the 600,000+ products found in the average grocery store? And...

It’s Okay to Be Smart: Who was the first human?

The question “Who was the first human?” was a very popular one in our house just last year, but the evolution videos we had in the archives – even the awesome – didn’t answer ...

TED Ed: The Mystery of Motion Sickness

One out of three people get motion sick, yet it’s not something we can really cure, only relieve. So what exactly is going on inside of our bodies when this happens? If you liked Head Sq...

Head Squeeze: Why do we get car sick?

Why do we get car sick? Sea sick? Air sick? Greg Foot of Head Squeeze explains. And here’s some related reading on ginger. Related videos: more brains! via Devour.

Biodegradable mushroom packaging from Ecovative Designs

What if we could replace plastics and styrofoam with something much more sustainable? Something that wouldn’t fill our landfills, pollute our beaches, or float out into our ocean gyres? ...

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