Topic: biology

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Camels vs. Cactus: Eating a prickly pear cactus with 6-inch needles

There's something about the prickly pear cactus that these camels like. And they like it enough to brave the six-inch needles on the pads or cladodes. Watch them eat in this video from Camel and Friends, a YouTube cha...

An up-close look at tardigrades and their poop

It is surely the stuff of science fiction: An extraordinary being arrives on Earth that can withstand a tortuous array of conditions: boiling, freezing, tremendous atmospheric pressure, near total dehydration, and exp...

Plastics 101: What is plastic and how is it made?

Once a completely natural product, much of today's plastic is man-made and largely dependent upon fossil fuels. From polymers to nurdles, learn how plastic is created and what we can do to slow the lasting repercussio...

What causes constipation?

Visiting the bathroom is part of the daily human experience. But occasionally, constipation, a condition that causes a backup in your digestive system, strikes. In some especially uncomfortable cases, the food you eat...

What’s the difference between hibernation and sleep?

The Arctic Ground Squirrel hibernates by burrowing under the permafrost and slipping into a state of suspended animation. The female black bear can give birth while she hibernates. The fat-tailed dwarf lemur prepares ...

Fungus: The Plastic of the Future

In 2014, Ecovative Designs was working to combine mycelium with local crop waste to make a compostable biomaterial for packaging, and continue to expand their efforts. One example: A collaboration with Netherlands-bas...

Weedy sea dragons exchange eggs from female to male

Weedy sea dragons (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus) are beautiful creatures who, like their seahorse relatives, transfer care of their developing young to the father until they mature. The actual exchange of weedy sea dragon...

A twisted squid, as seen by the NOAA Okeanos Explorer crew

This twisted squid was, at first, hard to identify because of its unusual, Nautilus-like folded pose, but the NOAA Okeanos Explorer expedition crew was able to get a better look from a different angle. The footage, ta...

Calaya gives birth to baby gorilla Moke at The National Zoo

"For the first time in nine years, primate staff at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute are celebrating the birth of a male western lowland gorilla. He was born at 6:25 p.m. April 15 and ...

The Mystery of the Upside-Down Catfish

Normally, an upside-down fish in your tank is bad news. As in, it’s time for a new goldfish. That’s because most fish have an internal air sac called a swim bladder that allows them to control their buoyancy and or...

How Birds Get Oxygen Inside Their Eggs

"Look inside this incubator. These eggs were laid 21 days ago and this one is just about to hatch. If you listen you can hear the chick pecking at the inside of its shell. Soon it will break through and take its first...

What causes body odor?

Most of us don’t need more than one whiff to identify that generally unpleasant, characteristic smell we call body odor. But it’s a surprisingly complex phenomenon, influenced by our genetic makeup, age, diet, and hyg...

The Story Behind Japan’s Bathing Monkeys – ScienceTake

A troop of 'snow monkeys' or Japanese Macaques at the Jigokudani Yaen-koen snow monkey park has been relaxing in the country's hot springs since the mid-1960s, a daily respite from the winter snow and an increasingly ...

Evolution 101 & how natural selection works – NOVA PBS

What is evolution, how has it created Earth's biodiversity, and how can a phylogenetic or evolutionary tree—a tree of life—help us better understand how different species are related? Learn some basics from this Evolu...

Incredible first footage of a deep-sea anglerfish pair

Behold this incredible first footage of a deep-sea anglerfish pair—a female Caulophryne jordani or fanfin angler and a dwarf male attached to her side. Those long 'whiskers' are filaments that may help her sense preda...

The Science of Skin

Between you and the rest of the world lies an interface that makes up 16% of your physical weight. This is your skin, the largest organ in your body: laid out flat, it would cover close to 1.7 square metres of ground....

Formation of a Pearl – Secret Life of Pearls

Australia’s northwest coastline is a stunning stretch of wilderness. Look beyond the shore and into the water, and you'll find more stunning sights, including Pinctada maxima, the Silver-Lipped Pearl Oyster. These ...

How do birds learn to sing?

A brown thrasher knows a thousand songs. A wood thrush can sing two pitches at once. A mockingbird can match the sounds around it — including car alarms. These are just a few of the 4,000 species of songbirds. How do ...

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