Topic: body

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How Old Is Your Body, Really?

Have you ever heard the statement that the cells in your body are completely replaced every seven years? Is this true? In this beautifully illustrated episode of Skunk Bear, NPR's Adam Cole explores how long our diffe...

The Blind Astronomer of Nova Scotia

Tim Doucette is legally blind, yet he sees the stars better than most people. A childhood diagnosis of congenital cataracts forced doctors to remove Doucette's lenses and widen his pupils. That left the amateur astron...

Why do some people have seasonal allergies?

If you've ever experienced watery eyes, sneezing, runny nose, itchy throat, and other allergic reactions during springtime, or you haven't but you know someone who has, this beautifully animated TED Ed by Eleanor Nels...

Opera singers sing during real-time MRI scans

Thanks to a team of researchers at the Freiburger Institute for Musician's Medicine, we get to watch this real-time MRI scan of baritone Michael Volle as he sings O Du, mein holder Abendstern (Oh thou, my fair evening...

Born with no fingers, teen Alexey Romanov is a piano prodigy

At 16 years old, Alexey Romanov has become a celebrated pianist across Russia. Born with no fingers, his growing love for classical music motivated him to start learning piano. In two years of diligent practice, Roman...

How do eyes work & how do glasses help us see?

Glass, water, and the eye are three different transparent mediums that change the direction of light, a phenomenon called refraction. Refraction in the eye helps us see by bending light into an accurately focused poin...

The Science of Skin Color – TED Ed

When ultraviolet sunlight hits our skin, it affects each of us differently. Depending on skin color, it’ll take only minutes of exposure to turn one person beetroot-pink, while another requires hours to experience the...

Evidence of evolution that you can find on your body

Signs of our evolutionary history can be found in the form of vestigial structures on the human body. Watch this Vox video to help identify the evidence of evolution in yours. Some background via Wikipedia: Vestig...

Stanford’s µTug microrobots can pull a car

Watch six of Stanford's µTug (MicroTug) robots pulling an unmodified 3,900lb (1,800kg) car thanks to special directional adhesive "shoes" and "a very long, very slow, but very steady winching gate." The six microTugs ...

A titanosaur in 360° VR with Sir David Attenborough

From the BBC's Attenborough and the Giant Dinosaur, this is a 360 degree virtual reality introduction to the 70-ton dinosaur known as a titanosaur. Grab a smartphone headset, or view it on your phone or desktop. S...

Astronaut Leland Melvin on Returning Home From Life In Space

What's it like to come back home to our Blue Marble after you've been floating around in orbit? NASA astronaut, engineer, and former football player Leland Melvin explains his return-to-Earth readjustment experience i...

Subvisual Subway – The Art of New York City’s Bacterial World

Why do we wash our hands after we've been riding on public transportation? Is it true that "using the handrails on the subway is like shaking hands with 100 people"? New York City-based typographer and designer Craig ...

Why Do Deep Sea Creatures Look So Scary?

Why Do Deep Sea Creatures Look So Scary? Anna Rothschild of Gross Science explains how different it is at the bottom of the sea: Food can be scarce, there's tremendous ocean pressure, and it's dark. These environmenta...

The origin of the dancing inflatable tube man

Where did those dancing inflatable men, called AirDancers or "tall boys", originally come from? Trinidadian Carnival artist Peter Minshall created these long-armed, long-legged, exuberant dancers -- plastic, body-shap...

Jump In Jerboas – Science Friday

"A furry little rodent version of a Tyrannosaurus Rex," the jerboa has tiny forelimbs, a "noodle" tail that helps with them with balance, long legs and really long feet, with toes that support their speedy hops. W...

This is What Outer Space Does to Your Body

NASA astronaut, engineer, and former football player Leland Melvin explains how the human body changes when it leaves the confines of Planet Earth. Your body may become taller, your heart might get smaller and change ...

The American Kestrel falcon’s head stabilization skills

Bertha is an American Kestrel, North America's smallest falcon. They are colorful raptors (specifically the males) with spotted plumage, including two eye-like black spots on the back of their heads that may confuse p...

A Sisyphus kinetic sculpture made with LEGO

Whether it's being powered by a hand crank or a motor, this Sisyphus LEGO kinetic sculpture by LEGO artist Jason Allemann is impressive, from the smooth movement of the figure's body to the myth-driven depictions on t...

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