camouflage

Showing 14 posts tagged camouflage

A few years ago, U.K. wildlife photographer William Burrard-Lucas started building a series of remote controlled DSLR camera vehicles as a DIY project. Named the BeetleCam, it’s now better protected, has space for a GoPro, and is a commercially available product.

Continuing to improve on his ideas and invent new ways to observe wildlife, Burrard-Lucas developed a gyro-stabilized BeetleBot and a BeetleCopter, which filmed the above scenes in the Serengeti, though they’re working on a quieter version. (A note for sensitive kiddos: half of a fresh kill shown at 2m14s.)

Below, a project update that shows all of his camtraptions.”

And look! Lion cubs stealing camerasHere’s one of the early teaser videos for an early version of the BeetleCam: 

In the archives: more Africa and so much nature.

via spectrum.ieee.org.

The size of a human fingernail, this tiny glass frog in Costa Rica is a wonder to watch. In this clip from the Discovery Channel’s Speed of Life, you can see the glass frog’s rice grain-sized, red heart and internal organs through its translucent belly skin.

Costa Rica has 13 species of glass frogs, and there are more than 100 species across Central and South America. However, because they are small, arboreal, nocturnal, and can live in extreme, wet areas, they can be hard to spot. Luckily, we have the internet:

Via National Geographic, this is Ecuador’s Hyalinobatrachium pellucidum glass frog.

There are more frogs and more videos about camouflage in the archives. 

Watch Biologist Dr Jonny Miller introduce the spectacular common potoo. It’s brown, blends in, and doesn’t move much… so why is it so spectacular? Exactly for those reasons. The common potoo is a camouflage master, bravely controlling its movements — or lack of them — in the face of predators. From Dr. Miller

Although you might not see them, the common potoo is, indeed, common in at least parts of its range. This rage extends from Nicaragua in Central America, south to Argentina. Six other species of potoo are known of, all generally similar in appearance and all performing the same posturing cryptic behaviour.

We’re always thrilled to find a scientist out in the field making videos about their work. Dr Miller is currently in ParaguaySouth America, studying capuchin monkeys, and has been blogging about the animals there at planetparaguay.com.