canada

Showing 24 posts tagged canada

Using 360-degree cameras to document the landscape and polar bears of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, teams at Google Maps, Earth Outreach, and Polar Bears International have made it possible for us to explore life on the tundra. This is behind the scenes of the Polar Bear Capital of the World:

This quiet town, set on the shores of western Hudson Bay, is a place where polar bears and humans coexist until the sea ice forms and the polar bears can travel on to the bay to hunt seals, their main prey.

During the warmer months, the polar bears are forced ashore by melting ice. While climate change may seem like a gradual process, often difficult to discern, the impact is real and evident in the polar bear capital. In Churchill, climate change has shortened the time that the bay remains frozen, reducing the polar bears’ hunting season by approximately four weeks…

In addition to this documentation, the team aims to educate about the polar bears’ quickly-changing habitat, and to inspire our reduction of carbon emissionsthe largest man-made contributor to warming the planet.

To learn more, check out these ways to reduce your carbon footprint. And then search for polar bears in Churchill.

In the archives: watch more polar bear stories, more conservation, and another video about how technology helps us understand our changing world: the Catlin Seaview Survey of the Great Barrier Reef.

via Inhabitat.

This breathtaking video of the Aurora Borealis is not a time-lapse video — this is what it looks like in real time. It was filmed in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada by astro-photographer Kwon O Chul, and not only displays the bright northern lights and these rather magical looking glowing teepees, but also sets them to the awed, ambient sounds of tourists in the cold night air.

A related must-watch: How the Aurora Borealis is created.

From the National Film Board of Canada, this is Quebec director Gilles Carle’s The Rink. Details we noticed on this idyllic Sunday in 1962: everyone’s warm breath in the cold air, there are no helmets on the hockey players, there are no visible logos or designs on the clothes like there are today, that ladder obstacle course looks fun, and bright red coats look absolutely amazing against the white snow and ice.

Watch more winter videos, including this 2012 ice skating on the Amsterdam canals vid.

Today’s daily dose of adorable comes from the Toronto Zoo in this clip of a 2-month old polar bear cub taking his first steps. The sole surviving bear in a litter of three, the cub has been living in the zoo’s intensive care unit since just after his birth so that his health could be monitored. He has since grown stronger and continues to reach new milestones, such as eating from a dish:

He also makes cute noises while sleeping:

"Our Wildlife Care Team has been working around the clock to look after this special cub. We are very happy with his progress so far. We hope that he will grow up to become another ambassador for his species, highlighting threats to the arctic environment," says Dr. Graham Crawshaw, a veterinarian at the zoo.

Polar bears are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

via CBC News.

Le Merle (the Blackbird) is a cutout animation directed in 1958 by cinematic innovator Norman McLaren. Based on a French-Canadian folksong, the story tells of a bird who loses a beak, a neck, eyes, wings, legs, etc, and then finds them in duplicate and triplicate.

In the archives: McLaren’s Spook Sport and Boogie Doodlemore 1950s greatness, and one more from the National Film Board of Canada: How Do They Recycle Steel?