chain reaction

Showing 14 posts tagged chain reaction

We love Rube Goldberg machines, and have posted about these short films from Japan’s NHK educational TV show, Pitagora Suitchi (PythagoraSwitch) before, so it’s no surprise that this 20 minute video collection of their Pitagora devices had the kids completely thrilled and mesmerized. The kinetic chain reactions were designed by a team from Keio University’s Masahiko Sato Laboratory. Watch them online while you can!

Related great fun: Joseph Herscher’s The Page Turner.

Thanks, @990000.

Between 20,000 to 25,000 dominoes fall in short scenes called “screenlinks” — separate tricks that are then edited together to make it look like one longer setup. Filmed by two domino artists, half of the tricks were set up in the United States by Hevesh5 and the other half were set up by millionendollarboy in Germany.

In the archives: more chain reactions, including this amazing lesson in domino physicsthis recent 275,000 dominoes Guinness World Record, and 2,131 books at the Seattle Public Library.

via @Tinybop.

In August, 2009, Stefan Schöppers and his team succeeded in breaking the world record for the largest domino toppled in a chain that begins with a “regular”-size domino. Their largest domino, shown in the video above, is 6.40 m (20 ft 11 in) in height.

That record held until an 8m (26 ft 3 in) tall domino was toppled in a on the Dutch National Science Quiz TV show in January, 2013. You can watch that video here.

So how does this all work? Learn more about the science behind the spectacle in this domino chain reaction video by Professor Stephen Morris, and enjoy more videos with dominoes.

275,000 dominoes toppled toward a new Guinness World Record with the help of German company Sinners Domino Entertainment

Last Friday we successfully toppled 272,297 out of 277,275 dominoes under the theme “Enjoy Your Life” at the Wilhelm-Lückert-Gym in Büdingen. After Wolfgang Naumann started the chain reaction, we immediately broke the world record for the most dominoes toppled in a spiral. Furthermore there were six areas with different motives and mechanisms.

There’s a tiny little plane involved. And pyramids. And pixel-style photos, walls of words, shelves, cascading walls, sliding hats, an aquarium… Really, I could keep going. The video is ten minutes long, which is long, but not as long as the eight days it took 12 builders to set it up!

via The Awesomer.

A domino can knock over the next domino at about 1.5x larger (perhaps 2x larger) and this instant video classic from 2009 is a great example of this chain reaction. Watch University of Toronto’s Professor Stephen Morris knock over a 1-meter tall domino that weighs over 100 pounds by starting with a 5mm high by 1mm thick domino. TINY.

There are 13 dominoes in this sequence. If Professor Morris used 29 dominoes in total, with the next one always being 1.5x larger, the last domino would be the height of the Empire State Building.

There are more chain reactions and many, many physics videos in the archives. 

via Physics Buzz.