cheese

Showing 3 posts tagged cheese

Chef Daniel Klein and camerawoman Mirra Fine of The Perennial Plate have traveled the world making videos about food and culture. The video above highlights ten iconic products of Italy and gives a peek into how they are made.

After this, watch their episodes about organic farming in Yunnan Province, China and using the entire coconut in Negombo, Sri Lanka

There are also more food videos in the archives, including how cheese is made and cheese robots. Yes, cheese robots.

So how does one make cheese? We know cheese is made from the milk of cows and goats, for example, but then what happens?

From the book, How Did That Get In My Lunchbox, we know a bit, but the video above showed some of the steps in action: 

A farmer milked the cows, and a tanker from the dairy came to collect the milk.

1. In the dairy, cheese makers warmed up the milk…

2. …and added bacteria to make it turn sour and thick.

3. Then they added a substance that animals use to digest milk called rennet…

4. …and it changed again into bits called curds, floating in whey.

5. They drained off the whey, chopped up the rubbery curds, added some salt, and pressed them into blocks.

6. They stored the blocks for months until the cheese was ripe. 

Many cheeses also use rennet alternatives, like vegetable rennet, microbial rennet or citric acid. Fresh cheeses like cream cheese, chevre, paneer, ricotta and mozzarella, can be eaten right away. Other cheeses are aged (like in these videos). Aging the cheese can take anywhere from a month for Monterey Jack, to 6 weeks for Camemberts and Bries, 3-6 months for Blue Cheese,  and 12 months for some parmesans. Some cheeses take even longer! 

Clearly, we fell down a cheese-making rabbit hole. These cheese flipping robots (specifically Gruyere-flipping robots) in Switzerland started it! Via Kottke: