communication

Showing 30 posts tagged communication

From the BBC’s Ocean Giants documentary, watch this incredible clip to hear the extraordinary and mysterious song of the Humpback Whale. Why do they sing (or hum)? Does it serve a purpose? Are they making music for pleasure? Are they talking?

If this clip disappears, you can find the entire documentary on Amazon. And in the archives: watch more whale videos, including a surprise diving encounter with a Humpback Whalethis huge baby Sperm Whale, and Whale Fall (After Life of a Whale).

Imagine sky writing on the ground using water and a modified tricycle – this is Water Calligraphy Device by French Canadian media artist Nicholas Hanna

Inspired by the water and brush calligraphy of older artists in his local Beijing parks, Hanna converted a Beijing tricycle, called a san lun che, to digitally “paint” (or more accurately drip) Chinese characters onto the sidewalk. The characters write out Dongcheng District Propaganda phrases that are on banners and housing developments in the district.

The trike would catch quite a bit of attention in the streets, as seen in these two 2011 videos by Jonah Kessel. According to Kessel, the tricycle drips:

营造 未成年人健康成长的良好环境
Create a good environment for minors to grow up healthy

文明从脚下起步 奉献从身边做起
Civilization comes from every individual, to contribute from every little thing

树文明新风 做文明市民
Be a civilized citizen and build a civilized new atmosphere for constructing s cultured and civilized city

共建文明城区 共享美好家园
Build a civilized city for everyone to share a beautiful home altogether

做文明有礼北京人 建和谐魅力新东城
Be civilized and polite Beijingers, to build a harmonious charm new Dong Cheng district together

美德贵在坚持 文明重在行动
Virtue shows through long term persistence, civilization reflects by actions

和谐东城 你我共建
Harmonious Dong Cheng District constructed by you and me

建全国文明城区 做东城文明市民
Constructs the national civilized district, to be the civilized citizen of Dong Cheng District

The project was first shown at Beijing Design Week in 2011. Hanna now lives in Los Angeles where he works as an artist and designer.

Related videos in the archives: Robo-rainbow and Osaka City Station’s “water printer” fountain.

In the mountains of Ethiopia, the BBC’s Steve Backshall and his Deadly 60 team track a group of graminivorous (grass-eating) gelada baboons to observe their amazing, lion-sized, canine teeth, which are central to the primates’ social communications. From Mary Bates at Wired’s Zoologic blog

The gum-bearing yawn was most common with males, especially high-ranking ones. This kind of yawn exposed the gelada’s impressive canine teeth, which stood out against the reddish-pink color of their gums and the inside of their mouths. It was often accompanied by a loud call, and the researchers believe the yawn functions as a long-distance display. Males used this yawn during periods of tension, such as the time right before feeding, suggesting it may serve to intimidate other geladas.

The other two less intense types of yawns were seen most in females during friendly interactions. The researchers found these yawns to be more contagious, and observed females mirroring the intensity of other females’ yawns. They believe these yawns are part of a complex communication system between geladas that often engage in friendly interactions. The contagiousness of the yawns in these contexts suggests the behavior might play a role in synchronizing the activity between two geladas, strengthening the emotional connection between them,  or signaling the quality of their relationship.

Gelada males and females might use yawns differently, but all three types of yawn contribute to the smooth workings of gelada society; they function to let everyone know who’s in charge and which geladas are friends.

In the archives: more BBC, more primatesmore yawns, and some teeth.

For ten days in a Pierogi Gallery space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, artists Ward Shelley and Alex Schweder lived in “a giant hamster wheel,” a large installation called In Orbit. From Animal New York

This is the fourth collaboration between Shelley and Schweder in a series they call “The Social Relationship Architecture Project.” Each time they’ve built a different dwelling space that requires them to work together in order to live. This time, they’ve arranged the various components and furnishings of a home on a giant wheel. “In Orbit is a two bedroom apartment, in a sense,” Schweder says. “One is on the inside and one on the outside.”

In the archives: more art installationsmore architecture and more wheels, including the Event of a Thread, la casa ecológica de botellas, and the unusual Dynasphere.

via Design Boom.