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Becoming Visible: Shattering stereotypes & misconceptions in science

The University of Florida's Florida Museum of Natural History celebrated 100 years of inspiring people to care about life on Earth in 2017. To mark the closing of an era and the beginning of a new century, UF News pro...

Why (and how) do whales sing?

Whale vocalizations are a bit of a mystery. We know that only the males of some baleen whales sing, but we're not sure what those compositions—specifically structured phrases and melodies that repeat and evolve within...

How did Polynesian wayfinders navigate the Pacific Ocean?

Imagine setting sail from Hawaii in a canoe. Your target is a small island thousands of kilometers away in the middle of the Pacific Ocean — a body of water that covers more than 160 million square kilometers. For tho...

The Anomalies: The Acorn Woodpecker

As their name implies, acorn woodpeckers rely heavily on acorns for sustenance. To make sure this seasonal resource remains available throughout the year, the birds build enormous “granaries” by drilling thousands of ...

A peregrine falcon mural time lapse for The Audubon Mural Project

A peregrine falcon mural takes flight in Harlem in this time lapse video from the National Audubon Society. Bonus: A cameo appearance by Fab 5 Freddy. Street artist Damien Mitchell painted the formidable raptor in Jun...

Where Does Elv Belong?

"This is Elv, and he's from outer space. His family moved to a brand new place. He knows this now, but he didn't before, that home can be one place... or more." Enjoy the story of Elv, "a meditation on home, friend...

Why, Traffic, Why?

Traffic during rush hour or when an accident has happened on the road ahead are both expected, but there are a lot of avoidable reasons for traffic in cities all over the globe: Slowing down to see something on the si...

Janet Echelman’s fiber sculptures billow among city buildings

Janet Echelman’s fiber sculptures billow, rise, and fall like iridescent bubbles hanging from a spider's web. Flexible and full of motion, the nets look soft, but they're also strong. Their structural cables are made ...

Marta Minujín’s ‘Parthenon’ of Banned Books in Kassel

In Kassel, Germany, at the very site where Nazis once burned over 2,000 books by Jewish and Marxist writers, one artist has built a colossal tribute to free speech. The “Parthenon of Books” is a giant temporary replic...

Where do new words come from? – TED Ed

There are over 170,000 words currently in use in the English language. Yet every year, about a thousand new words are added to the Oxford English Dictionary. Where do they come from, and how do they make it into our e...

UCLA’s Hummingbird Whisperer

Meet UCLA assistant researcher Melanie Barboni, who has become well known for the tiny birds that visit her feeders outside of a Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences window. She's known on campus as The H...

What does the word ‘theory’ mean in science?

There’s an important difference between a scientific theory and the fanciful theories of an imaginative raconteur, and this quirk of semantics can lead to an all-too-common misconception. In general conversation, a ‘t...

Waterlight Graffiti, a water-activated drawing wall of LEDs

Spray bottles, sponges and paintbrushes, wet hands, buckets full of water all light up this specially designed wall made from thousands of LEDs. The wetter it gets, the brighter it gets. Waterlight Graffiti is a 2012 ...

Greetings Around the World

When you see friends or acquaintances, do you hug or kiss on the cheek? Do you shake hands or say 'hey' and wave hello before starting a conversation? What greetings are most common where you live? The Cut travels...

A Few Things to Know About American Sign Language

What might people who use American Sign Language (ASL) want people who don't use it to better understand? DT Bruno, Kallissa Bailey, Ardavan Guity, Leyland Lyken, and Felicia Williams answer that question in this vide...

New Spring, mist-filled ‘blossoms’ grow from a ‘tree’

New Spring: A sculptural tree grows ‘blossoms’ full of white mist. They fall and bounce gently on the ground, or might pop when they're touched. The six meter (almost 20 foot) tall installation, filmed by Martyn White...

How the Bronx brought breaking to the world

Breaking began as a mode of self-expression; it was a part of a larger culture that reflected the social, economic, and political conditions of the youth at that time. Now, decades later, as the style and moves of bre...

Eighty Years of New York City, Then and Now

From The New Yorker, enjoy this split-screen juxtaposition of New York City in the 1930s and today. Cross the Brooklyn Bridge, tour Central Park, see huge differences in midtown and Times Square, get a glimpse at Harl...

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