computer

Showing 4 posts tagged computer

Giant Anteaters get in on the fun (and some yogurt) as Michael Hearst and PBS Digital Studios return with Songs for Unusual Animals. Michael visits the Nashville Zoo and then composes a song for the Giant Anteaters with all sorts of musical instruments found around his apartment.

Related watching: Songs for Unusual Creatures: The Elephant Shrew, the Otomotone Jumbo, and the Tube-Lipped Nectar Bat.

DYSKOGRAF is a graphic disk reader. Each disc is created by visitors to the installation by way of felt tip pens provided for their use. The mechanism then reads the disk, translating the drawing into a musical sequence.

The installation is above all a tool, which allows the creation of musical sequences in an intuitive way. The notion of a loop, closely linked to electronic music, is represented here by the cycle of the disk. The disk passes indefinitely in front of a camera fixed onto an arm. This substitution for the needle converts the drawing into sound by way of a specific application program (software). Through this system, the sequential ordering of music is learnt in a playful way, at the same time creating a unique object, souvenir of the musical composition.

The numeric world is a world of binary choice. The object of DYSKOGRAF is to give room again for accidents in numeric creation, accidents that often favour creativity.

Dyskograf was created by Jesse Lucas, Erwan Raguenes & Yro.

from Laughing Squid.

How does the internet work?! The World Science Festival explains it…

The video lets you ride shotgun with a packet of data—one of trillions involved in the trillions of Internet interactions that happen every second. Look deep beneath the surface of the most basic Internet transaction, and follow the packet as it flows from your fingertips, through circuits, wires, and cables, to a host server, and then back again, all in less than a second.

via Vidque.

The WCF in the archives: Bobby McFerrin demonstrates the power of the pentatonic scale.