conservation

Showing 60 posts tagged conservation

The next time that you’re in your local natural history museum, don’t just look at the large animals in the dioramas — really look for those hidden small animals, too: a brown-headed cowbird near a bison, a Botta’s pocket gopher peeking from a burrow, or a Blue Echo Butterfly on a flower. These smaller details in scenes get as much attention from museum staff as the central figures. 

Above, the American Museum of Natural History's Conservation Fellow Bethany Palumbo describes how she studied museum specimens of the Blue Echo to recreate it using a mix of photocopying, hand painting, and sculpting with layers of glue.

New York’s AMNH made a series of excellent videos about their dioramas from their 2012 restoration efforts

Every detail was studied for accuracy, down to the cougar’s whisker texture:

Even the shadows, background paintings, and native grasses demand proper attention to detail. After new, energy-efficient lights were installed, museum artist Stephen C. Quinn even altered the slight color variations of the crushed marble dust “snow” to better represent the moon shadows in the Wolf Diorama

Related watching: Ancient Ancestors Come to Life, How to Make a Large Crocodile Sculpture, Anatomy of Preservation, and Paleontology 101.

h/t Sagan Sense.

In this episode of Songs for Unusual Creatures, Michael Hearst visits the Frog Pod at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, and then collaborates with glass armonica player Cecilia Brauer on a new song for the amazing little glass frog.

We love glass armonica and glass frog videos. Watch more Songs for Unusual Creatures, more frogs, and more instruments in the archives.

Check out this bright green and blue Four-Toed Whiptail Lizard, Teius Teyou, a common animal in the grassy sands of Paraguay, South America. Biologist Dr Jonny Miller introduces the reptile, named for the four long, spindly toes on its back feet.

Only Superman himself could chase and catch one of these lizards - the one I’m holding in the video had fallen into a bucket trap from which I retrieved it. Bucket traps are designed for exactly that purpose - for animals to fall into! Biologists and conservationists use them to discover what species of small animal, particularly reptiles and amphibians, small mammals and large insects, are living in the area. The traps are checked regularly, a note of any visitors is made, and the bucket guests are then released as quickly as possible into the habitat.

Dr. Miller is currently in Paraguay studying capuchin monkeys and has been blogging about the animals there at planetparaguay.com.

In the archives with Dr. Miller: the Common Potoo and the aforementioned Red-Tailed Vanzosaur.

The daring 5-mile (8-kilometer) migration of Christmas Island’s adult red crabs begins with the wet season’s arrival in October or November. The crabs’ goal: move from the forest to the beaches en masse, breed, drop their eggs into the water, just before the turn of the high tide, and then return to center of the island.

This massive move of 50 million creatures is a spectacular sight. It’s also a challenge to keep them safe. As shown in the video above, Christmas Island National Park rangers do an immense amount of work to protect these animals as they traverse the roads that cross their path: cleaning up debris, constructing temporary fences, raking crabs across roads to avoid traffic, and closing some roads are all a part of the job.

There are more crabs crawling around in the archives, including migrating horseshoe crabs, a mass migration of Caribbean hermit crabs, and what it looks like when the Christmas Island red crab larvae hatch and head back for dry land.