conservation

Showing 60 posts tagged conservation

Zoologist Dr. Mauvis Gore describes her work monitoring basking sharks (Cetorhinus maximus) — the world’s second largest fish with “a mouth almost as wide as a piano" — in Episode 4 of the BBC’s Hebrides: Islands on the Edgenarrated by Ewan McGregor.

Having studied sharks, stingrays, and cetaceans across the globe, Dr. Gore has worked to gather information on these vulnerable gentle giants to better understand their migration patterns and decreasing populations, fueling conservation efforts to protect them.

There are more sharks in the archives.

Watch a butterfly drink turtle tears from a Yellow-spotted Amazon River Turtle (Podocnemis unifilis). Wait, what?

It’s true: butterflies and bees will drink turtle tears as a source of sodium and minerals. In turn, the turtles get their eyes cleaned. The video above was filmed in Peru by Ryan M. Bolton, photographer/videographer and trained conservation biologist. Farther below, there’s a photo in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park by conservation photographer Pete Oxford. Via LiveScience

Turtle tears are not the only source of such salts for butterflies; the insects also readily get the salt from animal urine, muddy river banks, puddles, sweaty clothes and sweating people, said Geoff Gallice, a graduate student of entomology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, who has witnessed butterflies flocking to turtle tears in the western Amazon rain forest.

This region is lower in sodium than many places on Earth, because it is more than 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) from the Atlantic Ocean, a prime source of salt, and is cut off from windblown mineral particles to the west by the Andes Mountains. Dust and minerals make their way into the Amazon from the east, sometimes all the way from north Africa. But much of this material is removed from the air by rain before it reaches the western Amazon, Torres said.


Related viewing: bees drinking turtle tears, and more amazing nature in the archives.

h/t Scinerds.

How do zoologists learn about the anatomy of different animals? And how do they display these specimens in the museums for us to observe and learn from? Watch the detailed deconstruction and reconstruction of a Jamaican Fruit Bat in the Anatomy of Preservation: A Journey from Specimen to Object of Study.

This time-lapse video from LSA’s Museum of Zoology takes the bat species Artibeus jamacanensis from specimen to display. The process might be a little stomach-churning, but then again, good science isn’t always mess-free.

As one of the largest university museums in the world, the Museum of Zoology is a crucial resource for use in research, conservation, and education. Studying animals such as Artibeus jamacanensis allows scientists to craft a tangible record of life on Earth.

via Ri Channel.

Little Rickina is a baby orangutan that was rescued from a suspected poacher, and is now being cared for at the Ketapang Orangutan Rescue Center, operated by International Animal Rescue. As a critically endangered orphan, she’s had a very difficult life, but this video shares a bit about the safe community that she’s now adjusting to. For more information, visit RedApes.org.

There are more babies and a family of orangutans in the archives. 

via ViralViralVideos.