Topic: crustacean

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A molting blue crayfish

The National Lobster Hatchery uploaded this incredible sped up footage of a molting cobalt blue crayfish (Procambarus alleni). Watch as it wriggles to free itself of its outer layer. From Reference.com: Crayfish m...

A blue whale lunges for krill

How can the largest creatures on the planet survive by almost exclusively eating some of the smallest creatures in the sea? In this video from Oregon State University, we get a very rare look at how blue whales eat ti...

Roly Polies Came From the Sea to Conquer the Earth

Woodlouse, pill bug, roly poly, sow bug, armadillo bug, cheeselog, wood shrimp... what do you call this bug where you live? Whatever you do, don't call it an insect! Roly polies are crustaceans, more like a shrimp...

The Snail-Smashing, Fish-Spearing, Eye-Popping Mantis Shrimp

The mantis shrimp is a fascinating creature. One kind impales prey with a spear-like appendage and another smashes prey with a built-in club — the fastest attack in the animal kingdom. "At 30 times faster than the bli...

Crab babies stampede toward water on a Bali beach

In 2008, Jeremias Maluw scooped up some sand crab babies (species yet to be identified) stampeding toward the water at Legian Beach in Bali. The video footage has since gone viral. Though grabbing a handful of these p...

Why is biodiversity so important? – TED Ed

Biodiversity, short for biological diversity, is the term we use for the variety of animals, plants, fungi, bacteria, and other intertwined life forms within any ecosystem... "from towering redwood trees to tiny, sing...

Pagurus Bernhardus hermit crabs change their shells

When a common marine hermit crab (Pagurus bernhardus) grows, it starts to look for slightly larger shells that it can live in. We know that it wants to carry around something more comfortable and appropriately-sized, ...

Watching a woodlouse flip over

Spend a quiet two minutes watching a woodlouse (aka pill bug, roly poly, cheeselog, , slater, sow bug, roll up bug…) flip over from its back. Known for curling up into a protective ball, th...

A crab takes a video camera into its hole

A crab finds a small video camera set up outside of its hole in Fiji. The crab decides to take the camera home…

Red crab migration on Christmas Island

The daring 5-mile (8-kilometer) migration of Christmas Island’s adult red crabs begins with the wet season’s arrival in October or November. The crabs’ goal: move from the forest to the beaches en ma...

Rendezvous With Horseshoe Crabs – Science on the SPOT

Called living fossils, horseshoe crabs are harmless creatures that have been swimming oceans for a few hundred million years. They predate dinosaurs and are closely related to spiders or scorpions. Every May and June,...

Caribbean hermit crab mass migration, U.S. Virgin Islands

Photographer Steve Simonsen films an epic Caribbean hermit crab mass migration at Nanny Point, St. John, in the U.S. Virgin Islands. This video has gone viral, and it’s pretty clear as to why! How many thousands...

A Caribbean hermit crab named Godzilla

This hermit crab is named Godzilla. He has been with his owner for three years and three moultings. Based on his size, he’s probably about 20-25 years old. Hello, Coenobita clypeatus!

Shelby the hermit crab changes into a brand new shell

This class pet is named Shelby, and she is one very lucky hermit crab. Why? Because she’s about change into a brand new shell that fits her growing body. We’re lucky because we get to see her make the move...

Red crab babies hatch and run for land – Great Migrations

From Great Migrations: Red crab larvae hatch and head for dry land, covering Christmas Island’s beaches with wiggly creatures trying to survive beyond hungry fish and determined ants.