Topic: demonstration

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Circular motion demonstration with a sparkler & a hula hoop

From physics teacher and film maker Alom Shaha, check out these simple demonstrations showing how something moving in a circle will move in a straight line when you remove the centripetal force acting upon that thing....

How to make simple homopolar motor ‘race cars’

Lay out a 'race track' of tinfoil, attach two round neodymium magnets to the ends of an AA battery x2 (or more) -- the polarity of the magnets matters, so experiment to see how your vehicle behaves (or doesn't) -- the...

Why do autumn leaves cause train delays? – Liz Bonnin

Why do 'leaves on the line' cause train delays, especially in autumn? The serious danger comes from a series of physics challenges: Leaves are sucked onto the tracks by the fast moving trains. The train wheels crush t...

The Pythagorean theorem water demo

The Pythagorean theorem water demo: See the two smaller squares of water on the two shorter sides of a right triangle pour perfectly and equally into the area of the larger square on the longer side, known as the hypo...

Professor Shoelace demonstrates the world’s fastest shoelace knot

What's the fastest way to tie your shoes? Professor Shoelace Ian Fieggen demonstrates the "Ian Knot", billed as the world's fastest shoelace knot: Make a loop with both ends and simultaneously pull them through ea...

Why do spinning rings & spinning disks have different paths?

In this silent video from Science Magazine, we can see how a spinning disk and a ring create two different paths while spinning. Try it at home. Do you see the same result? David Schultz at ScienceMag.org explains: ...

Rock Swing Cup & more DIY playground physics

Next time you're on the swings, think about what it might be like if you were swinging on the moon, free from air resistance. AP Physics teacher Jared Keester had that in mind during this experiment: Swing jumping wit...

Surprising Applications of the Magnus Effect – Veritasium

When you drop a basketball from a great height, in this case, 415 feet (126.5 m) off of Tasmania's Gordon Dam, the basketball will generally fall down into the area below where it was dropped. But what happens when yo...

Resonance, forced vibration, and a tuning forks demo

A U-shaped fork of steel first invented in 1711 by trumpet player John Shore, the tuning fork is a tool produces a specific note that helps musicians keep their instruments in tune. They also are a great conversation ...

Demo of the FloWave Ocean Simulator & the AMOEBA wave pool

Filmed by The School of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh, this is the FloWave Ocean Simulator, a 2.4 million liter (634,013 gallon) controllable research pool for testing devices and prototypes in wa...

Candle Chemistry – ExpeRimental

In this episode of ExpeRimental, Lisa and Josh explain the unseen as they make a flame jump through the air. Josh also measures how long it takes for covered candles to extinguish on their own. There's more activity i...

How to make bouncing eggs – ExpeRimental

Bounce, crack, dissolve, and make things a bit squidgy with stuff that's already around the house! The latest expeRiment from The Royal Institution is a classic for all ages: Olympia and her daughters, Viola and Elodi...

The Stacked Ball Drop (and Supernovas) – Physics Girl

How is a supernova like a basketball, a bouncy ball, and a golf ball all stacked together? It's all in what happens when you drop them. In this video, Physics Girl Dianna Cowern demonstrates the momentum transfer betw...

The Electric Sausage: A static electricity demonstration

Perhaps you've experimented with static electricity by using a balloon, paper clippings, your hair, a pencil, a plastic bag, or a Van de Graaff Generator... but have you ever used a sausage to see static electricity i...

The Ring of Truth: Two Hydrogen Atoms & One Oxygen Atom

Possibly the most well-known scientific formula on the planet, H2O is one of those terms that we see around all the time. We know that H2O means water, and that a water molecule is composed of two hydrogen (H) atoms &...

Ocean sponges have incredible filtering power

Ocean sponges are fascinating multi-cellular animals that don't walk or swim. They eat by filter-feeding, straining the water around them to capture organic debris particles and microscopic life forms. How powerfu...

How to build your own Wave Machine physics demo

This National STEM Centre DIY Wave Machine demo is a perfect hands-on experiment for home or in the classroom. The ingredients: Duct tape, wooden kebab skewers, and jelly babies, (or dots... or maybe gummy bears if th...

How to Make the World’s Simplest Electric Toy Train

How to make the World's Simplest Electric Toy Train from the Amazing Science YouTube channel, a super delightful science experiment that will wow kids, friends, family, science classes... pretty much everyone on the p...

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