dirt

Showing 10 posts tagged dirt

From KQED Science, find out how San Francisco’s 600 tons of compostable waste can be transformed into a dark, nutrient-rich material that will not only feed plants to improve the quality of what we eat and drink, but that also has the potential to offset America’s carbon emissions by over 20%. Above, agronomist Bob Shaffer takes us Inside the Compost Cycle.

Food scraps, mostly compostable, are over 30% of everyone’s garbage, and could instead help turn poor dirt into nutrient-rich soil where you live. If you’re interested in learning how to compost, check out these excellent links:

Watch more videos about sustainability, including the Moser Lamp, shaggy lawnmowers, Pierre’s high school greenhouse, Brooklyn’s Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, and how to use a paper towel.

An animal that can push with 40x their bodyweight, the hairy-tailed mole for example, is definitely something to better understand, and scientists at the University of Massachusetts and Brown University are trying to do just that. So how exactly do moles move so much dirt around as they tunnel underground?

From The New York Times’ ScienceTake: Uncovering the Secrets of Mole Motion.

Related locomotion videos: the design and movement of slithering snakes, a 600lb octopus and a goshawk can fit through tiny spaces, and Sir David Attenborough introduces the naked mole rat.

via @bittelmethis.

Meet Siats (pronounced SEE-otts) Meekerorum, the first giant mega-predator to be discovered in North America — specifically in the Utah desert — in over 60 years. In this Untamed Science video, we hear from Dr. Lindsay Zanno, Director of the Paleontology & Geology Research Laboratory at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, who explains how this 30 foot long, 4-ton, carnivorous creature flourished in the tens of millions of years before T-Rex ruled.

Untamed Science has visited Dr. Zanno before: Paleontology 101, a must-watch for anyone who loves dinosaurs.

via Scientific American.

To study the architecture of ant colonies and their nests, entomologist and myrmecologist Walter Tschinkel developed a way to “record” their three-dimensional underground chambers: he pours 1200F molten aluminum into the hill and then excavates the hardened cast. The entire process can take around seven hours.

From the tunnel depths, patterns, variations, the “room” arrangements, and more, these resulting casts are full of information about different ant colonies and their behavior:

"You can see that where there’s a lot of traffic near the surface, the shaft is actually a ribbon, a wide tunnel like a superhighway," he says, gesturing to and describing the incredibly intricate ant architecture. “The more traffic it has, the wider it is.”

And beyond that, the sculptures mix science with art. But, of course, there’s a cost of insect life in this process:

"I don’t do it lightly, actually… The technique has helped prove that colonies can thrive up to 3.6 metres deep and house between 9,000 and 10,000 workers."

Filling the nest with molten aluminum (or concrete, as shown in this rather stunning video) started an interesting discussion in our house: sacrificing an entire ant colony to learn about it — agree or disagree? And why?

Related reading: Not All the Bugs In Your Home Are Bad.

via jtotheizzoe.

Made by Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada for the Ulster Bank Belfast International Festival in Belfast, Ireland, this is WISH, an 11 acre portrait of a girl. It’s been nicknamed “The Face From Space” by locals.

Using 2,000 tons of topsoil, 2,000 tons of sand, grass, stones, and 30,000 manually placed wooden stakes, the face was originally plotted with state-of-the-art GPS technology, and then took four weeks and a huge team of community volunteers to make. Here’s a time lapse vid of their work.

We’re wondering if the project can be seen from the International Space Station. Follow this up with Sesame Street’s That’s about the size.

via Colossal.