drawing

Showing 35 posts tagged drawing

In a mix of artistry, geometry, and technology, San Francisco-based Earthscape artist Andres Amador creates massive sketches in the beach sand – sometimes geometric, and sometimes more abstract and serendipitous – using rakes and ropes. The designs are temporary; where the waves don’t wash away his work, walking beach visitors and the wind will naturally muddy and dissolve the precise lines.

Amador has become keenly aware of how impermanent his work is, and has embraced nature’s tidal rhythm, starting one hour before low tide and continuing to work until an hour afterward. In this KQED Arts video, he explains: 

People are really… they’re enthralled that i would do something that is destined to wash away. That really strikes a chord with people because really, truly, it’s the story of our lives. Our lives are impermanent, and the tide is unstoppable.

And though this art form is tied directly to nature, Amador makes great use of modern technology. The designs can be both checked and appreciated-in-full from high above the beach using a remote controlled helicopter.

To see more from high above, visit AndresAmadorArts.com or view more photos here.

In the archives, two other incredible beach art videos: One Plastic Beach and Theo Jansen’s wind-fueled Strandbeests.

From KQED.

"Physics told me some crazy stuff. Say, I’m not just sitting here doing nothing. I’m actually fighting against Earth’s gravity. And I’m not sitting still. I’m spinning at a thousand miles per hour, or even more than that… 67 thousand miles per hour, if you count the rotation of the Earth around the Sun…"

In this graduation project that sums up her efforts in a dual degree program (animation and physics) presented by Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design, this is Xiangjun Shi's Why Do I Study Physics?

Follow this up with Vi Hart’s Doodle Music.