earth curvature

Showing 14 posts tagged earth curvature

With footage taken from the International Space Station, NASA fan Bruce W Berry Jr cleaned up and created this Time-Lapse | Earth homage. The location views are listed in order: 

1. A Jump over the Terminator
2. Sarychev Volcano
3. From Turkey to Iran*
4. Hurricane Irene Hits the US
5. Indian Ocean to Pacific Ocean Through the Cupola*
6. Central Great Plains at Night*
7. Aurora Borealis over the North Atlantic Ocean*
8. Aurora Borealis from Central U.S.*
9. Up the East Coast of North America*
10. Myanmar to Malaysia*
11. Western Europe to Central India 
12. Middle East to the South Pacific Ocean
13. Aurora Borealis over Europe*
14. City Lights over Middle East*
15. European City Lights*
16. Northwest coast of United States to Central South America at Night
17. Moonglow over Canada and Northern U.S.*
18. Stars from the Pacific Ocean (1)
19. Stars from the Pacific Ocean (2)
20. Stars from the Pacific Ocean (3)
21. Stars and the Milky Way over the Atlantic*
22. The Milky Way and Storms over Africa (1)
23. The Milky Way and Storms over Africa (2)

Footage Note: The slower video represents a closer resemblance to the true speed of the International Space Station; this footage was shot at one frame per second. Clips are all marked with an *.

There are more International Space Station videos in the archives, including a tour of ISS and what is perhaps our favorite time-lapse view: Further Up Yonder: A Message From ISS To All Humankind

Thanks, @MarbleSpark.

We’ve seen this experiment a few times before, but never with Hello Kitty “catonaut” in a Japanese rocket made by a 12-year-old. And perhaps not with such a glorious pop:

NASA doesn’t have a lock on space exploration anymore. Just ask Lauren Rojas, a seventh grader in Antioch, Calif., who recently launched a balloon to 93,625 feet using a do-it-yourself balloon kit from High Altitude Science

The project is a terrific illustration of just how accessible the near-space environment has become. High Altitude Science was founded two years ago by Joseph Maydell, a flight controller for the International Space Station at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, who wanted everyone to experience the beautiful views of the planet that he got to see in the course of his work.

Not only does Maydell sell a kit and a flight computer on his site, but he also includes tutorials to get started with.

From the archives, more views of Earth’s curvature

via Scientific American.

In her final days as Commander of the International Space Station, Sunita Williams of NASA recorded an extensive tour of the orbital laboratory and downlinked the video on Nov. 18, just hours before she, cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko and Flight Engineer Aki Hoshide of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency departed in their Soyuz TMA-05M spacecraft for a landing on the steppe of Kazakhstan. The tour includes scenes of each of the station’s modules and research facilities with a running narrative by Williams of the work that has taken place and which is ongoing aboard the orbital outpost.

So good… 25 minutes of it!

via Devour.

Further Up Yonder: A Message From ISS To All Humankind by film student Giacomo Sardelli, using images and audio messages courtesy of NASA. The video’s transcript: 

As the most forward deployed citizens of the planet at this moment, and the first expedition crew aboard Space Station Alpha, we are well started on our journey of exploration and discovery, building a foothold for men and women who will voyage and live in places far away from our home planet. We are opening a gateway to space for all humankind.

As we orbit the planet every 90 minutes, we see a world without borders and send our wish that all nations will work towards peace and harmony. Our world has changed dramatically, still the ISS is the physical proof that nations can work together in harmony and should promote peace and global cooperation, and rich goals that are simply out of this world.

On this night, we would like to share with all, our good fortune on this space adventure, our wonder and excitement as we gaze on the Earth’s splendor, and our strong sense that the human spirit to do, to explore, to discover has no limit. 

Times are hard all over the world, but this is a time when we can all think about being together and treasuring our planet, and we have a pretty nice view of it up here.

via @ReidGower.

After flying to an altitude of 39,045 meters (128,100 feet) in a helium-filled balloon, Felix Baumgartner completed a record breaking jump for the ages from the edge of space, exactly 65 years after Chuck Yeager first broke the sound barrier flying in an experimental rocket-powered airplane. Felix reached a maximum of speed of 1,342.8 km/h (833mph) through the near vacuum of the stratosphere before being slowed by the atmosphere later during his 4:20 minute long freefall. The 43-year-old Austrian skydiving expert also broke two other world records (highest freefall, highest manned balloon flight), leaving the one for the longest freefall to project mentor Col. Joe Kittinger.

Related watching includes the jump in legos, the suit cam view, and really, the best one: the realtime jump-prep, jump and landing — the jump starts right around here.

via Discovery News, Kottke, and EarthSky.