education

Showing 52 posts tagged education

From Nice and Serious and the scroll-worthy storytelling of Every Last Drop, this UK-made primer is excellent for reminding everyone to save water, especially those of us who live in drought-affected areas like California and the western United States.

In the archives: more Nice and SeriousLove Food Hate Wastefish and frogs living out of water, and awesome conservation videos of all kinds.

The question “Who was the first human?” was a very popular one in our house just last year, but the evolution videos we had in the archives – even the awesome Five Fingers of Evolution TED Ed video – didn’t answer it directly enough for my kids. This visual-filled video timeline from Joe Hanson of It’s Okay to Be Smart does: There was no first human.

You can never pinpoint the exact moment that a species came to be, because it never did. Just like how you used to be a baby and now you’re older, but there was no single day when you went to bed young and woke up old…

There was no first human. It sounds like a paradox, it sounds like it breaks the whole theory of evolution, but it’s really a key to truly understanding how evolution works. 

Also, your grandparents (a hundred eight-five million generations removed) were fish!

In the archives, more videos about evolution, Neil deGrasse Tyson explains evolution, and a related must-watch video about our human history: Carl Sagan’s Cosmic Calendar from the original Cosmos.

From jtotheizzoe.

Bill Nye The Science Guy bikes down a long road in wide open country to demonstrate a scale model of the solar system – a classic clip. Total distance of his ride to Pluto, back before Pluto was known as a dwarf planet: almost 2.5 miles (4 kilometers).

Related links: Scale of the Universe, Distance to Mars, and If the Moon Were Only One Pixel.

Related watching: Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot, animated, Charles and Ray Eames’ Powers of Ten, Veritasium’s How Far Away is the Moon?, and the Royal Observatory’s Measuring the Universe.

In 1961, an interactive exhibition called Mathematica: A World of Numbers… and Beyond inaugurated the new science wing at Los Angeles’ California Museum of Science and Industry. Sponsored by IBM, it was an innovative exhibit designed by husband and wife team Charles and Ray Eames, and lucky for us, it included five short animations that explored a handful of math concepts. Watch three of our favorites:

Above, 2ⁿ – “a story about the exponential growth of numbers raised to powers.” Below, Symmetry and testing for degrees of it:

Also, Topology – how a closed curve dissects a plane into inside and outside sections:

And in the archives, don’t miss this iconic Eames film: Powers of Ten.

via Tinybop.

From PBS’ Adventures in Learning, Jennifer Cooper hosts an Electric Dough playdate to make and test circuits. For this project, developed by engineering educator AnnMarie Thomas, you’ll need homemade conductive play dough and insulating play dough, a battery pack, batteries (we highly recommend these rechargeables), and light emitting diodes/LEDS. Click here for the how-to details.

Related hands-on projects: LED Origami and Sick Science! Build a Lightbulb. Bonus: Circuit Playground’s A is for Ampere.