egg

Showing 17 posts tagged egg

Watch this Kiwi chick hatch from an egg at Auckland Zoo. This is the season’s second hatchling for BNZ Operation Nest Egg, a program that collects the eggs of endangered and critically endangered wild kiwi. Hatched and protected until they are big enough to return to their native populations, this process has increased their chance of surviving to adulthood to 65%, up from just 5% in the wild.

Watch more videos of birds, zoos, and eggs, including this very different kind of hatching video: the Lord Howe Island Stick Insect.

Despite what it looks like, this is not a short clip from a Hayao Miyazaki film. These are banggai cardinalfish eggs with still-forming fish inside. Their eyes are quite clear. Can you see their heartbeats?

These three small creatures were filmed pre-hatched by Richard Ross, CalAcademy’s Senior Biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium. Normally, male banggai cardinafish, Pterapogon kauderni, keep around 90 fertilized eggs in their mouths for 30 days while the eggs mature — they don’t eat at all during that month — but on occasion, some eggs are spit out early. Here’s another video that shows larger babies in a male’s mouth:

The caption by mikew9788: “They are so big now you can see that they have the same coloration as the adults. I expect the male to spit the babies out any day now.” 

While they are bred successfully in captivity, Banggai are endangered in the wilds of the Banggai Islands in Sulawesi, Indonesia. You can learn more at Banggai-Rescue.com.  

Watch more fish and more babies.

via Earth Touch.

Polar Bears Eat Goose Eggs in the Arctic’s summer months, but now scientists are studying how melting sea ice might affect the bears’ eating habits in the years to come. Will more eggs be on their menu? Utah State University Ph.D candidate David Iles narrates this remote camera footage from Western Hudson Bay near Churchill, Manitoba, as we watch polar bears find these high-calorie snacks (and a few of the birds that laid them): 

“In terms of snow geese there’s 50,000 pairs out there, and that could be quite a substantial benefit to polar bears that do happen to take advantage of them,” he continued. “But what we don’t yet know is how often that overlap happens, what types of bears are taking advantage, and what it could mean for both polar bears and waterfowl.”

There are more details about the balance of these animals and the changing ecosystem that they share in this corresponding National Geographic article.

Related bears-on-hidden-camera fun: What goes on when you are not there.