engineering

Showing 76 posts tagged engineering

Festo HQ, the engineering team that brought us Aqua Penguins, Aqua Jellyfishdragonfly-inspired BionicOpters, and a robot that flies like a bird can now add Bionic Kangaroo to their list of animal-inspired achievements in technology. From spectrum.ieee.org

BionicKangaroo is able to realistically emulate the jumping behavior of real kangaroos, which means that it can efficiently recover energy from one jump to help it make another jump. Without this capability, kangaroos (real ones) would get very very tired very very quickly, but by using their tendons like elastic springs, the animals can bound at high speeds efficiently for substantial periods of time.

BionicKangaroo emulates this with an actual elastic spring, which partially “charges” the legs on landing.

Bonus fun: wear the corresponding armband and you can control the kangaroo using gestures. Mmmmmmm, biomechanics.

via Gizmodo.

A few marble machines are clickity-clacking in our archives, but never have we seen ones that are designed as laser-cut, flat-packed, wood DIY kits! Hopefully on sale soon from RetroTime.org, a hand cranked Kit2 Marble Machine, above, and a hand cranked Modular Marble Machine - Shield no.2, below: 

There are more kit videos on RetroTime’s YouTube channel.

And in our archives: marble machines and Rube Goldberg machines, including the increasingly-difficult-to-find-on-the-internet Pitagora Suitchi.

via The Awesomer.

Using nothing but LEGO components, the team at Brickride builds supercool rollercoasters. The one above: Incredible 100% LEGO Roller Coaster with Corkscrew. Watch a time-lapse of how they put it together.

In the archives, more LEGO and other awesome toy builds: LEGO Great Ball Contraption, DIY paper rollercoasters, amazing marble machinesK’nex Clockwork, and what you can do with a lot of toothpicks.

via The Awesomer.

For ten days in a Pierogi Gallery space in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, artists Ward Shelley and Alex Schweder lived in “a giant hamster wheel,” a large installation called In Orbit. From Animal New York

This is the fourth collaboration between Shelley and Schweder in a series they call “The Social Relationship Architecture Project.” Each time they’ve built a different dwelling space that requires them to work together in order to live. This time, they’ve arranged the various components and furnishings of a home on a giant wheel. “In Orbit is a two bedroom apartment, in a sense,” Schweder says. “One is on the inside and one on the outside.”

In the archives: more art installationsmore architecture and more wheels, including the Event of a Thread, la casa ecológica de botellas, and the unusual Dynasphere.

via Design Boom.