Tag: entomology

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Shake Your Silk-Maker: The Dance of the Peacock Spider

When a peacock spider dances, how do we know that it's a really, really good dancer? From their colorful, iridescent body displays, to their wide variety of dance moves, to the different rhythms that they "sing" while...

Pouring 1200F molten aluminum into an anthill?

To study the architecture of ant colonies and their nests, entomologist and myrmecologist Walter Tschinkel developed a way to “record” their three-dimensional underground chambers: he pours 1200F molten a...

Gross Science: Carnivorous Plants and Killer Ants

In this episode of NOVA’s Gross Science, Anna Rothschild introduces us to the carnivorous fanged pitcher plant (Nepenthes Bicalcarata) that preys on unsuspecting insects, but has a special relationship with one parti...

Butterflies that drink turtle tears

Watch a butterfly drink turtle tears from a Yellow-spotted Amazon River Turtle (Podocnemis unifilis). Wait, what? It’s true: butterflies and bees will drink turtle tears as a source of sodium and minerals. In ...

Meet the Natives: Wild Bees

As honey bee populations decline (from pesticide and fungicide use, parasites, and a mix of other factors), scientists like entomologist Claudio Gratton are exploring the exciting idea of pollinating our plants and c...

Plants and Insects Magnified Thousands of Times

German photographer Stefan Diller has made micro worlds into immense and detailed landscapes to fly over. After three years of work, he’s refined a mix of scanning electron microscope (...

Earth Touch‘s iPhone Films: Metamorphosis.

From a small egg hidden on a leaf, to an adult soaring high across the sky, take a journey with Earth Touch's iPhone Films team to witness a butterfly’s Metamorphosis.

The Peacock Spiders of Australia

Entomologist Dr. Jürgen Otto films the Peacock Spiders of Australia, and they are super fun to watch. Though they are not well documented, there are 20 known species of these small jumping spiders. They have huge eye...

Wonders of Life: Monarch Butterflies

Professor Brian Cox explains how Monarch Butterflies navigate by “monitoring the position of the sun, and compensating for its location in the sky using their internal timekeeping mechanism… even when it&...

Up close with a Stag Beetle, a Long-horned Beetle and a Tube Web Spider

Stuart Hind, Identification and Advisory Service Manager at the Natural History Museum in London, spends his days identifying the bugs that people bring in to the museum. Jars, match boxes, s...

Indian Walking Sticks

Tommi Vainionpaa keeps Indian Walking Sticks (Carausius Morosus) as pets. They are about 10cm long each, perhaps as long as 15cm if you include their legs. He filmed them eating, climbing and trying to hide in plain...

Life in the Undergrowth: Ant life in the Australian mangroves

David Attenborough narrates ant life in the Australian mangroves — “various kinds of trees up to medium height and shrubs that grow in saline coastal sediment habitats in the tropics and subtr...

Velvet worms

Velvet worms, or peripatoides novaezelandiae, can be found around the glob, including Australia, Africa, Asia, Costa Rica, and Brazil… these particular leggy creatures in the video are f...

Orchid Mantis

Meet the Orchid Mantis. Native to Malaysia, they camouflage with flower petals, specifically white and pink ones. “In this way the mantis can remain unseen for predators such as birds and at the same time can ca...

A critically-endangered Lord Howe Island Stick Insect hatching

In a world first, zookeeper Rohan Cleave captured the amazing hatching process of a critically endangered Lord Howe Island Stick Insect at Melbourne Zoo. The eggs incubate for over 6 months and until now the hatchi...

Life Cycle of the Silkworm

Meet the Bombyx Mori in its caterpillar, larva or “worm” state — silkworm to be specific (though it’s not a worm at all). There’s an entire series of videos online...