Topic: evolution

Sort: Date | Title | Sort Ascending
View:

The Amazing Shapes of Ammonites

Now extinct, ammonites are abundant, prehistoric sea molluscs that first appeared in the fossil record around 240 million years ago. The images of ammonites that we often see in museums and books are planispiral-shape...

Evolutionary branching in action: Bacteria adapt to antibiotics

Watch E. coli bacteria encounter increasing strengths of antibiotics, the medicine that we use to fight infections or infectious diseases. A team led by Harvard Medical School's Michael Baym set up the video demonstra...

The Guillemot egg, an egg that saves its own life

Guillemots are sea birds that reside in crowded colonies on rocky cliff sides. When they breed, they produce one conical egg which incubates for around 30 days on the precarious cliffside... but guillemots don't make ...

Explaining The Tree of Life

Travel millions of years through time with Sir David Attenborough as he explains The Tree of Life. Some background on the metaphor from The New York Times: In his 1859 book “On the Origin of Species,” Charles Darw...

Rock-Paper-Scissors Lizards

Biologists from UC Santa Cruz are studying the three distinct mating strategies of what's being referred to as "rock-paper-scissors lizards," the blue, orange, and yellow variations of the Western side-blotched lizard...

Dinosaur fossils uncovered on an Antarctic expedition

A team of 12 scientists recently completed an audacious fossil hunting expedition to James Ross Island in Antarctica, and returned with over one ton of marine, avian, and dinosaur fossils that are between 71 million a...

Scorpion evolution, scorpion moms, & glowing scorpions

Scorpion facts: Scorpions have been on Earth for 400 million years, scorpions give birth to live young and then catch them in their arms, and under ultraviolet light, scorpions fluoresce. Scientist and Cal Academy Cur...

Dinosaurs Among Us – AMNH

Dinosaur nests, eggs, and babies, dinosaur feathers, dinosaur brains and lungs, and dinosaur bones, beaks, and claws all provide evidence that birds are living dinosaurs. In this video from the American Museum of Natu...

Illustrating the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Wall of Birds

In 2014, artist Jane Kim was commissioned to paint a mural of 270 representative bird species -- including some extinct species, a few dinosaurs, and a black caiman -- on 3,000 square feet (280 square meters) of wall ...

The Science of Skin Color – TED Ed

When ultraviolet sunlight hits our skin, it affects each of us differently. Depending on skin color, it’ll take only minutes of exposure to turn one person beetroot-pink, while another requires hours to experience the...

Evidence of evolution that you can find on your body

Signs of our evolutionary history can be found in the form of vestigial structures on the human body. Watch this Vox video to help identify the evidence of evolution in yours. Some background via Wikipedia: Vestig...

Why Do Deep Sea Creatures Look So Scary?

Why Do Deep Sea Creatures Look So Scary? Anna Rothschild of Gross Science explains how different it is at the bottom of the sea: Food can be scarce, there's tremendous ocean pressure, and it's dark. These environmenta...

How do we know what color dinosaurs were?

The meat-eating microraptor was a black-feathered, four-winged dinosaur. How do we know its feathers were black? The evidence is in the microraptors' fossils. This TED Ed explains. Plus, more from Wikipedia: In Mar...

The 12 Days of Evolution – It’s Okay to Be Smart

Joe Hanson of It's Okay To Be Smart celebrates the diversity of life with 12 days of videos dedicated to explaining evolution and natural selection. Above: What is evolution, anyway? From Berkeley’s Understanding ...

Animated Life: Mary Leakey & the Laetoli footprints

Forty years ago in Laetoli, Tanzania, an elephant dung fight between a couple of paleoanthropologists led to a discovery: a fossilized animal print, at least 3.6 million years old. But the site had an even bigger surp...

Paleoartist John Gurche reconstructs the face of Homo naledi

Paleoartist John Gurche is known for his award-winning reconstructions of our ancient human ancestors. His process of mixing forensic accuracy with emotional realism has been featured in documentaries by National Geog...

Deep in the caves with Homo Naledi & the Rising Star Expedition

More than 1,500 individual bones and teeth of at least 15 skeletons of Homo naledi were excavated by an all-woman "underground astronaut" team during the 2013/14 Rising Star Expedition. Homo naledi is a new species in...

Why Warm Blood is Better Than Cold – Rise of the Mammals

What does a tiny Hadrocodium wui fossil tell us about the evolutionary advantages that mammals were developing before the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction event that finished off the dinosaurs 65 million years ago...

« Prev