explosion

Showing 6 posts tagged explosion

This street vendor makes popcorn with an explosive, pressure-cooking, popcorn cannon contraption, a centuries-old method. The video was filmed in Zhengzhou, China, but we’ve watched videos of this in South Korea, too. And of course, Mythbusters has looked into it, video below. Boom!

Related watching: Click to Enlarge: Popcorn, more explosions, and more videos of street vendors, including how this intricately-drawn melted caramel/sugar dragon is made.

via Boing Boing.

Dr. Roy Lowry of Plymouth University in the UK made science explosively exciting for his class by demonstrating how powerful (and loud) it can be when the pressure of cold, trapped Liquid Nitrogen, a liquified gas, is warmed in a bucket of water. Then he added 1500 Ping Pong Balls.

If that didn’t make sense, watch. He’ll explain it all. And then when you see him pour the balls in and run away (it’s dangerous!), cover your ears or turn down the volume, and let the science commence!

(Updated video link.)

Thanks, @bneller and @mamagotcha.

Over 40,000 rockets blasting off from the wall of the Geffen Contemporary.

On Saturday April 7, artist Cai Guo-Qiang marked the opening of his exhibition with Mystery Circle: Explosion Event for The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; a site-specific work created for MOCA. This edit was made to be viewed in our galleries as part of Cai Guo-Qiang’s installation.

via Vimeo.

Previously from Cai Guo-Qiang: Daytime Fireworks.

I wasn’t sure that these “daytime fireworks” were compelling (ie. different than any other explosion) until I saw the rainbow around the 50 second mark. Wow. 

At the Arab Museum of Modern Art in Doha, Qatar this week, Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang put on his largest “explosion event” of the last three years, utilizing microchip-controlled explosives to form incredible designs and patterns. The video we’ve embedded of the event is an impressive testament to how a volatile black powder explosion can be controlled and shaped by computer.

Each set of explosions was calculated to paint a different picture. One series of explosions created black smoke clouds that looked like “drops of ink splattered across the sky.”

via @nickbilton