eyes

Showing 9 posts tagged eyes

Have you ever seen the makings of a face on an inanimate object? Did you have any googly eyes handy at the time? As we’ve featured before, eyebombing" or "vandaleyes-ing" is when you add googly eyes to something, creating a face that wasn’t quite there before. Nuria Pérez Paredes and her daughters fell in love with the idea and recently took to the streets for some Eyebombing in Madrid. Thanks to the video above, we get to come along…

In the archives: visit Spain.

Thanks, Nuria.

Despite what it looks like, this is not a short clip from a Hayao Miyazaki film. These are banggai cardinalfish eggs with still-forming fish inside. Their eyes are quite clear. Can you see their heartbeats?

These three small creatures were filmed pre-hatched by Richard Ross, CalAcademy’s Senior Biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium. Normally, male banggai cardinafish, Pterapogon kauderni, keep around 90 fertilized eggs in their mouths for 30 days while the eggs mature — they don’t eat at all during that month — but on occasion, some eggs are spit out early. Here’s another video that shows larger babies in a male’s mouth:

The caption by mikew9788: “They are so big now you can see that they have the same coloration as the adults. I expect the male to spit the babies out any day now.” 

While they are bred successfully in captivity, Banggai are endangered in the wilds of the Banggai Islands in Sulawesi, Indonesia. You can learn more at Banggai-Rescue.com.  

Watch more fish and more babies.

via Earth Touch.

In this extraordinary adaptation strategy, Thailand’s Moken sea gypsies can see twice as clearly underwater by controlling the size of their pupils. What was generally considered an automatic reflex for the rest of us is now thought to be something that any child under 5 could learn how to do.

From a study called Superior Underwater Vision in a Human Population of Sea Gypsies by Dr. Anna Gislén:

The Moken may learn to do this due to their extensive use of their eyes in water, where accommodation and concurrent pupil constriction is necessary for them to see the items they gather for food. It should then be possible for all humans to learn to see better underwater. But because sea gypsies have lived by and off the sea for thousands of years, evolution may also have favored those who had intrinsically better underwater accommodative powers. The ability to see well underwater could have become a genetic trait. Another possible explanation is that accommodation underwater is a side effect of the diving response; the parasympathetic nerves that control this reflex also control pupil constriction.

Read more at National Geographic.

In the archives: more swimming and these extreme eye closeups.