falling

Showing 20 posts tagged falling

Which tire will roll down the ski jump fastest and jump the farthest? A Formula One tire? An enormous bulldozer tire? The smallest tire? This clip from Japanese television has made the rounds in years past, but the video source disappeared. We watched it again when it reappeared on Metafilter. Gotta love the lab coats, white gloves, and the surprising last jump.

So which of these six tires would you guess makes the biggest jump? And why?

In the archives, more physics of falling and jumping: domino chain reaction, 2,000 ping pong balls and 30 teachers in zero-g, a cat landing on its feet, and the jumping sand flea robot.

There are quite a few neodymium magnets falling through copper pipes on the internet, but we can still understand why this demonstration video is making the rounds: it’s just so cool looking! We’ve covered the phenomenon of magnetic damping before:

When a magnetic field moves through a conductor a current called an Eddy current is induced in the conductor due to the magnetic field’s movement. The flow of electrons in the conductor creates an opposing magnetic field to the magnet which results in damping of the magnet and causes heating inside of the conductor similar to heat buildup inside of power cords. The loss of energy used to heat up the conductor is equal to the loss of kinetic energy by the magnet.

And a note of caution if you decide to try this, these magnets are not for unsupervised children. In fact, everyone should be careful: 

Neodymium magnets larger than a half inch are very strong and should be handled with extreme care since they can be dangerous. It is best to stick with neodymium magnets of quarter inch diameter or less.

Want to know more? Look up Lenz’s Law and watch Veritasium’s Derek Muller demonstrate how this phenomenon is related to English scientist Michael Faraday and the first electric generator, created with a magnet and a coil of wire in 1831:

Physics! Another must-watch magnet-doing-magic-like-things-video comes from the Ri Channel: Levitating Superconductor on a Möbius strip

Between 20,000 to 25,000 dominoes fall in short scenes called “screenlinks” — separate tricks that are then edited together to make it look like one longer setup. Filmed by two domino artists, half of the tricks were set up in the United States by Hevesh5 and the other half were set up by millionendollarboy in Germany.

In the archives: more chain reactions, including this amazing lesson in domino physicsthis recent 275,000 dominoes Guinness World Record, and 2,131 books at the Seattle Public Library.

via @Tinybop.

In August, 2009, Stefan Schöppers and his team succeeded in breaking the world record for the largest domino toppled in a chain that begins with a “regular”-size domino. Their largest domino, shown in the video above, is 6.40 m (20 ft 11 in) in height.

That record held until an 8m (26 ft 3 in) tall domino was toppled in a on the Dutch National Science Quiz TV show in January, 2013. You can watch that video here.

So how does this all work? Learn more about the science behind the spectacle in this domino chain reaction video by Professor Stephen Morris, and enjoy more videos with dominoes.