fire

Showing 22 posts tagged fire

What’s happening when a match is lit? From Answers.com

Matches contain sulfur, glass powder, and an oxidizing agent as the components in the match head. When you strike a match, the friction due to the particles of glass powder rubbing together generates enough heat to convert some of the red phosphorous to white phosphorous, which burns in the presence of oxygen gas. The heat from the friction also causes the oxidizing agent to produce oxygen gas, igniting the small amount of white phosphorous. Once ignited, the oxygen gas fuels the flame while the rest of the sulfur catches on fire. Of course, this entire process happens in a fraction of a second.

…unless, of course, someone films it at 4000 frames per second, and then you really get to spend time with all of the macro, slow-motion details. Fascinating to watch, and a great conversation starter about fire prevention and safety tips, and using matches as tools.

Related watching: Why do hot things glow?, firefighter helmet cam, and Smokey and The Little Boy.

Thanks, @_thp.

From Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls YouTube series: meet firefighter Xochitl Hernandez, one of 57 female firefighters in Austin Fire Department. Hernandez explains why she loves her job, and shares some of the amazing equipment that she uses with her brigade to help people in need.

There’s more to check out at AmySmartGirls.com, and watch more excellent firefighter videos in the archives.

Toast the bread over hot coals rather than high flames, so that the heat is able to reach the center of the dough before the outside burns; rotate the stick often to ensure even cooking. The bread will be done when it has a deeply golden exterior and sounds hollow when tapped—around 5 minutes, depending on the heat and how thinly the dough was rolled.

From Kinfolk’s Issue Four, Stick Twist Bread for campfires. Film by Tiger in a Jar.

There are more recipes in the archives.

BBC News: How do you turn rubbish into energy? Find out how the largest energy recovery facility in Oslo, Norway processes waste and converts it into approximately half of the city’s energy. The integrated waste management system has been so successful that Oslo has had to import trash from other countries to keep up with energy demands.

Simply burning trash is known for putting toxins into the air, but according to recent reports, Waste-to-Energy (WTE) technologies have made advances in “almost completely eliminating" dangerous emissions. WTE supporters also encourage more recycling and minimization of waste as first steps in the waste management heirarchy pyramid.

Also, there’s a huge claw.

Watch more videos about trash in the archives.