fish

Showing 50 posts tagged fish

Swim in a reef off the coast of Thailand’s Ko Phi Phi Ley where critically endangered Hawksbill turtles have a stronger population than in most places. Earth Touch cameraman Stewart Whitfield narrates his underwater adventure, observing glass fish, a flatworm, java rabbitfish, long-fin bannerfish, and this Hawksbill turtle as it snacks on a jellyfish.

In the archives: videos of more turtles and more jellies.

The question “Who was the first human?” was a very popular one in our house just last year, but the evolution videos we had in the archives – even the awesome Five Fingers of Evolution TED Ed video – didn’t answer it directly enough for my kids. This visual-filled video timeline from Joe Hanson of It’s Okay to Be Smart does: There was no first human.

You can never pinpoint the exact moment that a species came to be, because it never did. Just like how you used to be a baby and now you’re older, but there was no single day when you went to bed young and woke up old…

There was no first human. It sounds like a paradox, it sounds like it breaks the whole theory of evolution, but it’s really a key to truly understanding how evolution works. 

Also, your grandparents (a hundred eight-five million generations removed) were fish!

In the archives, more videos about evolution, Neil deGrasse Tyson explains evolution, and a related must-watch video about our human history: Carl Sagan’s Cosmic Calendar from the original Cosmos.

From jtotheizzoe.

This amphibious fish is called a mudskipper and it uses its pectoral fins to walk on land, specifically mud. It also rolls, jumps, digs, excavates, socializes, fights for territory, and breathes air while not being in the water. Watch this amazing clip from the David Attenborough-narrated BBC Life seriesepisode 04: Fish.

Related watching from the same episode, two weedy seadragons dance into the night, and from Sci-news, a walking bamboo shark.

A few years ago, the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France joined up with an entire book of animated creatures to perform the classic Le Carnaval des Animaux (The Carnival of the Animals) by Camille Saint-Saëns.

Video of the performance, in 14 movements that represent different animals — a lion, a turtle, hens and roosters, elephants, fish, kangaroos, and more — was then packaged into an iPad app. It has become one of our favorites, not only due of the mix of animation and live action, but also because of how much time we get to spend with musicians playing beautiful music with their instruments. The video above is the grand finale. Highly recommended, along with these two newer apps from the same label: Pierre et le loup and Les 4 saisons d’Antoine.

Watch more videos with orchestras and more Saint-Saëns.