forest

Showing 17 posts tagged forest

Maple trees + good timing + basic chemistry = maple syrup. But Science Friday takes us behind the scenes of maple syrup research to show that there’s much more to it than that. While the tradition has been to tap fully grown wild trees – commercially with lots of plastic tubing – recent experiments at University of Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center have found that harvesting from the cut tops of juvenile trees might yield 5 to 6 times per acre, surprisingly without harming the young trees.

Lots of questions about this one: What are the other differences between the farm vs forest model of growing trees? Does this new process affect the local birds or creatures underground? What do these young trees look like in 20 years? What questions do you have?

File under: food, trees, and how things are made.

From Science Friday.

Join Dr Charlotte Uhlenbroek as she treks into northwest Rwanda to meet a family of critically endangered mountain gorillas for the first time. This was filmed for the BBC nature documentary series Cousins (2000).

In the archives, meet more gorillas and watch one of our favorite ape videos: an orangutan family spends quiet time together in the jungle.

Alaska: The Nutrient Cycle by wildlife filmmaker Paul Klaver.

Once they enter fresh water chum salmon stop feeding and morph into an aggressive creature intent only on mating. After spawning, they die and their bodies become a source of nutrients for everything in the forest and sea.

This 14 minute video had the kids riveted and shows how the end of the salmon’s life directly benefits the animals and ecosystem around them. A note a warning for more sensitive viewers: this video includes a lot of creatures eating very dead-looking fish.

There are more videos tagged with life cycle and death in the archives, including Radiolab’s excellent Whale Fall.