Topic: gas

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Explore wastewater treatment with LeVar Burton & Reading Rainbow

How do we use technology to turn human waste into water that we can drink? This Reading Rainbow field trip is an excellent introduction to how we use bacteria, solar power, oxygen, gravity, chlorine, and more to reuse...

A solid, liquid, & gas at the same time – The Triple Point

How can a chemical be a solid, a liquid, and a gas at the same time? In the video above, a clear liquid called cyclohexane is experiencing the perfect pressure and temperature combination for its solid, liquid, and ga...

ExpeRimental: How to make fizzy bottle rockets

This ExpeRimental episode from The Royal Institution is full of super explosive fun. Danielle and Michael show a group of kids how to make fizzy bottle rockets with some small, sports-capped plastic bottles, some Alka...

The Ring of Truth: Two Hydrogen Atoms & One Oxygen Atom

Possibly the most well-known scientific formula on the planet, H2O is one of those terms that we see around all the time. We know that H2O means water, and that a water molecule is composed of two hydrogen (H) atoms &...

Volcanic Eruptions 101: How It Happens

How do volcanos work? From explosive eruptions to creeping lava flows, this NYT video explains the anatomy of a volcano, and how the unseen underground variables can make it difficult to know how a volcano might behav...

It’s Okay to Be Smart: Why Do Clouds Stay Up?

Clouds are filled with so many water droplets that they're actually heavy... like 100 elephants heavy or a 747 airplane heavy! So why don't clouds fall out of the sky? It's Okay to Be Smart's Joe Hanson explains every...

ExpeRimental: Homemade Lava Lamp & Rubber Band Cannons

Explore the densities of liquids and household objects with Olympia Brown and her daughter Viola. This is episode two of ExpeRimental, a new science-at-home series by the Royal Institution of Great Britain that aims t...

This is NOT timelapse: the Aurora Borealis in real time

This breathtaking video of the Aurora Borealis is not a timelapse video — this is what it looks like in real time. It was filmed in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada by astro-ph...

Match burning in slow motion

What’s happening when a match is lit? From Answers.com:  Matches contain sulfur, glass powder, and an oxidizing agent as the components in the match head. When you strike a match, the ...

Dara Ó Briain’s Science Club: What is a comet made of?

What makes up a comet? Professor Mark Miodownik mixes the makings of one together with comedians Dara Ó Briain and Mark Steel in this episode from Dara Ó Briain’s Science Club.

How can we know anything about distant exoplanets?

How can we know the size, composition, and atmospheric makeup of distant exoplanets? NASA explains the details in this Alien Atmospheres video.  By observing periodic variations in the pare...

Snow Facts Cheat Sheet: How is snow made?

How is snow made? What temperatures make different kinds of snow? And can two snowflakes look exactly alike? The Science Channel has a quick Snow Facts Cheat Sheet video for questions just like this. There are more ...

Leidenfrost Maze: Self-propelled droplets on a hot jagged surface

The Leidenfrost Maze, designed and built by Carmen Cheng and Matthew Guy at the University of Bath, demonstrates how Leidenfrost droplets can be self-propelled in a controlled way by the jagged...

The Top 5 Places to Look for Alien Life

Where might we find life in our solar system? Via skeptv, Scientific American Space Lab has a countdown for that: Top 5 Places to Look for Alien Life. Bonus — the video comes with additional reading material:  ...

Above: time lapse clouds above Japan

Above, a cloud time lapse film that documents the skies above Japan throughout the summer, filmed and edited by photographer Suishu Ikeda. There are more clouds in the archives.

TED Ed: The ABCs of Gas

Using chalk drawings and familiar, hands-on examples, Brian Bennett and TED Ed explain gas properties in The ABCs of Gas – Avogadro’s Law, Boyle’s Law, and Charles’s Law, via explore-blog. T...

Why So Many Cloud Types? How to identify clouds

What are the names for the clouds you see when you look up in the sky? In this video from Nova PBS, learn about nimbus (rain), cumulus (heap), cirrus (curl), stratus (layer), and other types of clouds, and why both th...

Dancing Mud: the bubbling mud pots in Rotorua, New Zealand

These are the boiling mud pots of Rotorua, a city in New Zealand known for its Māori culture and geothermal activity. It is the only city in the world that is located on an active geothermal field. Geothermal act...

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